116 Years Ago Today in Dayton

tent in camp site

[NEWS FROM] DAYTON

Charles Sheppler of Wedron Sundayed at Dayton.

Some nice fish are now being caught above the dam.

Charles Clodt and son Charles, spent Sunday at Serena.

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Channel and son, of Marseilles, spent Sunday here.

Miss Marguerite Clodt is spending a few days with Mr. and Mrs. Ed Clodt.

Mrs. Stella Kelly and child are now visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Cullimore.

Miles Masters, formerly of this place, but now of Ottawa, made a flying visit here on Tuesday.

G. L. Makinson, now employed at Hess’ factory, will shortly remove his family to Ottawa.

Miss Etta Barends, of Joliet, is spending her vacation with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jos. Barends.

Miss Ruth Fleming, who has been spending the past four weeks at Earlville, returned home on Saturday.

Farmers are getting along nicely with their threshing, and will soon be through if the weather holds good.

Miss Nellie McGraw, of Streator, who has been visiting the Misses Coleman, returned home on Sunday evening.

Frank Corell was stung on the hand by a large bumble bee on last Saturday. He quoted scripture in French for a few moments.

There are just fifty houses in Dayton, fourteen of which are vacant. The tile, brick and grist mills, also the electric light plant, are all idle.

Last Thursday, Miss Mary Coleman, on entering the barn, discovered a huge snake about four feet long. A neighbor was called, and his snakeship was killed.

The camp just north of the ice house above the dam, is certainly an ideal spot. There are about a dozen glass blowers from Streator at the camp, and sometimes as many as fifty visitors can be seen enjoying camp life at one time. Good boating, turtle soup and fresh fish always on hand, and no one who ever visited there ever went away without leaving sweet memories behind. On Saturday, August 17th, will be “Ladies’ Day” at the camp, when the wives and lady friends of the members will be present and a most enjoyable day is expected by all. Good music and dancing will be one of the features of the day.

Twenty-nine boys ranging in age from five to ten years of the “Fresh Air Fund” arrived over the Q. R. R. at 11:17 A. M. on Tuesday. A number of ladies and gentlemen from Ottawa met them at the train and escorted them to their camping ground, just west of Basil Green’s residence. The camp presents a very pretty appearance, everything about it being very neat and tidy. Eight tents comprise the sleeping apartments, while one dining, two commissary and one kitchen tent make up for the rest. Felix Mader of Ottawa presides over the culinary department, while Charles Caton acts as his assistant. Through the courtesy of Mr. Basil Green a dam has been built just south of the camp, where the boys may bathe and enjoy a fresh water bath, unlike that of the Chicago river. Judging from the first day or two, the visitors next week will be very numerous, and will no doubt wake up this old burg, which has so long been sleeping.1


  1. Ottawa Free Trader, 9 Aug 1901, p12, col 1

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