The Missing Marker

It has long been known, from memories and newspaper accounts, that a marker was erected on the east side of the river at Dayton during the centennial celebration in 1929, commemorating the arrival of the Green party. However, the brass marker disappeared years ago and no one remembered exactly what it said.

I was looking through some old family stuff recently and I came across this snapshot. If blown up, it’s possible to read the text, which says:

1829        1929
ERECTED BY THE DESCENDANTS OF
JOHN GREEN
WHO ARRIVED HERE
WITH THE FOLLOWING PARTY ON
DECEMBER 6, 1829
JOHN GREEN AND FAMILY
REZIN DEBOLT AND FAMILY
DAVID GROVE AND FAMILY
HENRY BRUMBACH AND FAMILY
JACOB KITE      ALEXANDER MCKAY
HARVEY SHAVER   SAMUEL, JOSEPH
AND JACOB GROVE
THEY IMMEDIATELY BEGAN THE
CONSTRUCTION OF A DAM, SAW AND
FLOURING MILL WHICH WERE THE
FIRST IN NORTHERN ILLINOIS
THE GREENS ERECTED THE FIRST
WOOLEN MILL IN ILLINOIS ON THE
OPPOSITE BANK OF THE RIVER IN
1840

This picture was taken at the 1929 dedication.  From information on the back , these people are-
Back row: Harold Dunavan, Herberta Schabes holding her daughter Dolores, Harold’s wife Marie, Clara “Coe” Dunavan, Herbert L. Dunavan
Front: Muriel, Marion and Buddie

Thanksgiving In and Around Dayton – 1901

 

turkey

CORRESPONDENCE
DAYTON

The Fox river at this point is frozen over.

Len Hubbell is spending this week in Chicago.

A. W. Ladd made a business trip to Aurora last week.

Charles Sheppler has been laid up for a few days with a lame back.

John Marshall of Serena made a business call here on Saturday.

George Galloway enjoyed his duck at his own fireside on Thanksgiving day.

Mr. and Mrs. Moore spent a couple of days last week with friends at Earlville.

The Mutual Protective League meets on Wednesday night at Woodman hall.

Miss Mary Coleman and Miss Mary Cloat spent Wednesday and Thursday at Streator.

John Hippard has joined the T., P., & C. W. brigade and is now one of their teamsters.

Miss Mary Dunn of Ottawa spent Sunday with the Misses Mary and Maggie Coleman.

Mrs. Edwards and daughter, Mamie, of Ottawa spent Monday at Mr. and Mrs. James Timmons.

Mr. Isaac Green and family were guests of Mr. and Mrs. O. W. Trumbo on Thanksgiving day.

Mrs. John Lannel [Channel] and A. W. Ladd were visiting Mr. and Mrs. Beik’s at Ottawa on the 28th.

Corn husking is nearly over in the corn fields, but has just commenced at the fireside in the store.

Miss Jennie Barnes starts for Joliet in a few days to spend the winter with her sister, Mrs. Winn Green.

Mrs. Marguerite Mills and Mrs. Brown of South Ottawa spent Friday with Mrs. George Galloway.

One hundred and fifty bushels of corn were sold here on Monday for sixty cents per bushel, cash.

John Green and son, Percival, former residents here for many years, spent Sunday with friends here.

Mrs. John Gibson and son, Fred, left for Chicago on Tuesday, where they will make their home for the present.

Roy McBrearty, operator for the Q. at Denrock, spent Thanksgiving with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. McBrearty.

Mr. and Mrs. George La Pere dined with Mrs. La Pere’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Lohr, on Thanksgiving day.

Mr. and Mrs. Ed McClary spent Thanksgiving with Mr. E. H. Pederson and wife, deputy U. S. marshal at Yorkville.

Miss Blanche McGrath and Miss Kate Hogan of Streator were guests of the Misses Colman on Thanksgiving day.

The ticket winning the watch at the raffle on Saturday night was No. 31, and was held by Joseph Futterer of Ottawa.

William and Walter Breese and Lowell Hoxie and wife of Aurora spent Thanksgiving with Mr. and Mrs. John Breese.

John Campbell, feeder watchman at Dayton, has tendered his resignation, the same going into effect December 1st, 1901.

The Woodman Lodge will elect their officers on Tuesday night, December 10th, at 7:30, at their hall. A large attendance is expected.

On account of the scarcity of water in the feeder the electric plant was compelled to shut down on several occasions the last few days.

Bert Edwards, who has been employed as teamster for George Green, has gone to Streator, which city he expects to make his future home.

William Collamore, Jr., of Ottawa and Miss Olson of near Morris, gave Thanksgiving at the home of William Collamore, Sr., and wife, on the 28th.

Mrs. Ed Vernon and two children left for Somonauk on Saturday morning, where she will be the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Colb for a few days.

John Cisco of Ottawa is now acting as feeder watchman until the successor of John Campbell, resigned, is appointed.

W. Wheeler and R. Doran left here for Chicago on Wednesday morning where they will visit the fat stock show and will remain until Saturday.

Wilmot Van Etten, agent for the Q. at Batavia, with his wife and three sons, Clare, Walcott and Frank, dined with Mr. and Mrs. O. W. Trumbo on Thanksgiving day, returning on the afternoon train for Batavia.

The commissioners of the Illinois and Michigan canal met at Lockport on Tuesday to appoint a feeder watchman to take the place of John Campbell, resigned. Mr. George Galloway of our little burg was also present in the interest of one of our citizens, who has resided in our midst for the past nine years. Mr. G. with his credentials made an interesting effort in behalf of Mr. William Collamore and returned home on Tuesday night with the pleasing news that Mr. Collamore had been appointed. Mr. Collamore, the new appointee, is well deserving the place he is about to fill. He has always been a staunch Republican, served three and one-half years in the war of the rebellion in the Fifty-eighth regiment, Company G., Illinois Volunteers. Mr. Collamore and his family will shortly move into his new quarters on the banks of the feeder. Well, William, that your journey along the tow path, from Dayton to Ottawa, for the next four years may be one of pleasure and no thorns to mar your path is the wish of your many friends of Dayton.


  1. Free Trader, December 6, 1901, p. 12, cols. 1-2

News From Dayton – November 1879

 

C. B. Hess

Barbara Grove Green

Grandma Green

Rural Happenings

Dayton, Nov. 20 – Winter, cold winter has come. No more we’ll hear the robin sing.

Birth-day parties are all the go. C. B. Hess, Esq. was surprised last week by a lot of young folks who came in honor of his 39th birth-day. A good time was had.

Another good time was the one in honor of Grandma Green’s 87th birthday. About 50 were present.

Miss Mamie Davis of Newark, Ohio, is visiting friends and relatives in town.

Messrs. Geo. W. Green and Joseph Green took in the Grant “boom” at Chicago last week.

Mr. A. Spencer departed for Texas last week. We understand he will take charge of a restaurant.

  1. L. Grove, Esq., started Wednesday morning on a trip to Nebraska, to be gone about ten days.

Mr. David Grove has fallen heir to a small fortune, and departed Monday for Pennsylvania where it is held for the heirs.

Miss Estella Bagley returned on Monday from Wenona where she has been engaged in the milliner business.

Messrs. Richard Walker of Earl and his brother John Walker of Ohio, spent a few days in Dayton last week. Mr. John Walker was a resident of this place thirty-two years ago, and this is his first visit since that time.

Mr. Geo. W. Gibson returned last week from his trip to Nebraska.

Rev. G. Barnes of Ottawa will give his views on the “Future Life” at the school house this evening.

Rev. Mrs. Gibb will preach at the school house next Sabbath evening.

The tile works have quit work for the winter. They have a fine lot of tile on hand for sale.

The late rains have raised the river somewhat, though it still continues fordable, notwithstanding the “raise.”

Our sidewalks have been repaired to some extent during the past few weeks. They had been in a somewhat dangerous condition.

Messrs. T. MacKinley and John Gibson, of Rutland, departed last Friday for Newark, Ohio, on a short visit.

Our schools are progressing finely under the management of Mr. Chas. K. Howard and Miss Ada Green.

Occasional1


  1. The Ottawa Free Trader, November 22, 1879, p. 8, col. 2

A Goodbye Party

 

 

 

 

 

[The customs of the time tended toward formality on occasions such as this. We would find Barbara’s response for the family a little unusual. Luckily, the formalities were followed by bountiful refreshments.]

On Saturday evening last, the old friends and neighbors of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Dunavan, of Dayton, gathered in and treated them to a handsome good-bye surprise, it being on the eve of their departure to their new home in Colorado. Some valued presents were given them as memorials, on the offering of which, Mr. Frank Trumbo, as spokesman for the visitors said:

“Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Dunavan: – Your friends and neighbors, learning with sincere regret that you have determined to remove from our midst, and make your future home in another State, take this opportunity to bid you good-bye. For more than half a century you have been with us, even one of us, sharing without complaint the hardships of a pioneer life, and at last rejoicing with us in the reclamation and progress of this marvelous country; with your mental abilities yet undimmed, and possessing an amount of your former vigor and strength that is seldom retained by persons of your advanced age, you have decided to build for yourselves a home in another locality. In far off Sunny Colorado, protected by the giant Rockies, we trust you will be permitted to enjoy many years of a life that, from the activity of your minds, must be spent in deeds of usefulness.

“Language forms an inadequate channel in which to express our sorrow at your departure from among us, and only through the silent clasping of our hands can we show our regret. In remembrance of your many sterling qualities, of your unimpeachable hospitality, and your much prized friendship, we present you, Mr. Dunavan, with this cane, and you, Mrs. Dunavan, with this album; and also, with these, the knowledge that deep in the recesses of our hearts the names of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Dunavan will be revered as among the founders of our beautiful Prairie State.

“To you, Miss Alice Dunavan, to whom an indulgent nature has given the attributes of a true and perfect woman, your devotion to your parents in the declining years of their lives deserves a recognition at the hands of your friends. We, therefore, tender you this album, with the wish that it will soon be filled with the pictures of your Illinois friends.”

To which Miss Barbara Green responded:

“I will in behalf of the family, as this is all a surprise, and they are not prepared to respond (if their feelings would permit) to the presentation of these gifts, that, aside from their value, will be cherished as coming from life long friends, as purely disinterested tokens of respect – may I not say affection? – I will in a few words express their gratification in seeing you here to make them a farewell visit at the old homestead where in young wedded life they began the battles incident to a new country at a time when, with the exception of two, who crossed the river to commence the family circle in that happier home, all the others of the large family that grew to manhood and womanhood in this same home nest and have made homes for families, are now taking their place in the busy world, that has been transformed from a wilderness to the rank of the highest civilization, almost under the notice of a generation. I know that all will be glad to see this family that through misfortune and causes that are constantly taking place in this seeming hard world, starting anew with the ambition and vigor of youth to begin life again in a new country, but very different from pioneer life in Illinois when they began their home first they now leave with many heartaches, and the greatest is caused in leaving the old life, long associations and friends, never to be forgotten. And they hope to retain a place in the memory and hearts of all who have proved friends in adversity as well as in prosperity.

“I will now thank you all in their name for the testimonials of affection that your kind hearts have prompted you to tender them tonight.”

The formal part of the occasion over, bountiful refreshments were served and the evening was spent in social amusements.1


  1. The Ottawa Free Trader, March 3, 1888, p. 4, col. 5

The Rest of the Story

This is the follow-up to last week’s story, which may be seen here[Note that George Benoit’s name was spelled Bennett in the initial articles on this event.]

INDICTMENTS RETURNED
Against Mary McWilliams and George Bennett for Attempted Murder

From Wednesday’s Daily
The special grand jury summoned to investigate the McWilliams affair began their labors on the case at 9 o’clock this morning and by noon were done and returned indictments against Mary McWilliams and Geo. Bennett, charging them with an assault with intent to commit murder by poisoning. The charges were conclusive and the jury completed its work in short order. Neither of the defendants was able to give bail and they now occupy quarters in the county jail. It is thought that they will enter a plea to the charges and in less than a week they will be doing time in Joliet.1

GIVEN THEIR REWARD
Bennett and Mrs. McWilliams Sent to Joliet Prison Yesterday

George Bennett and Mrs. Mary McWilliams were given a long season by Judge Blanchard yesterday afternoon in which to meditate upon the consequences of a double crime, that of unfaithfulness and attempted murder. They were brought before the court by the sheriff’s officials to plead to the indictments found against them on the previous day, and, as both had made confessions, she that she had placed the poison in her husband’s tea at Bennett’s suggestion, and Bennett that he had purchased the poison and given it to her for the purpose of putting McWilliams out of the way, they expressed no desire to stand trial, but threw themselves upon the mercy of the court by pleading guilty.

Judge Blanchard said that he considered Bennett the plotter and real culprit, as he had alienated the affections of the wife, while having a family of his own, and then sought to wholly possess the woman by making her the executioner of her husband. On this account he gave Bennett the full limit of the law, fourteen years in Joliet, but gave Mrs. McWilliams seven years because of the fact that she had been more a dupe and a tool than a willing criminal. Both took their sentences hard, especially the woman. Their intended victim, the husband, John McWilliams, has fully recovered, and is now as well as ever.2

MRS McWILLIAMS CONFESSES
She Admits That She Placed the Poison in the Tea

From Sunday’s Daily
Mrs. John McWilliams, wife of the man who all but expired from Strychnine poisoning Friday noon, confessed at the county jail last evening that she placed the deadly drug in her husband’s tea for the purpose of putting him out of the way. Rumors to the effect that McWilliams had poisoned himself with “Rough on Rats” are without foundation, for, though he may have made such a statement in his delirium, the fact is that the poison was strychnine. Mrs. McWilliams is closely confined in jail, while her husband, who is still very weak, is in the county asylum, on account of the lack of a city hospital.3

TELLS THE STORY
George Benoit Admits That He Figured in the Poisoning

HE IS CAPTURED AT LA SALLE
He Says That the Whole Affair Was Arranged Weeks Ago by Mrs. McWilliams and Himself and She Administered the Dose

From Monday’s Daily
But little has been said of the McWilliams affair, which occurred on Friday last, up to the present time, owing to the fact that George Benoit, one of the accessories to the crime, was not captured until last night. As soon as he heard that he was wanted he made his escape from Dayton and went to La Salle, where he remained with his sister-in-law. As stated in yesterday’s paper, Mrs. McWilliams made a confession of the whole affair on Saturday, and Sheriff Taylor lost no time in hunting up the abode of Benoit. He was captured at La Salle and brought to Ottawa this morning and placed in the county jail. This afternoon he was brought before State’s Attorney Blake and told the whole story. He said that Mrs. McWilliams made the proposition to him to do away with her husband so that they might get married, and on Saturday, Oct. 22, he purchased the strychnine in this city. Benoit took the matter very cooly. He is a man of family, and according to his own statement intended to get a divorce from his present wife after McWilliams was out of the way and marry his wife.

McWilliams has fully recovered from the effects of the poison and on Saturday did not seem desirous of prosecuting the matter. But the authorities told him it was no longer in his hands and that there would be a rigid prosecution. The case will come up at the January term of the court.4


  1. The Ottawa Free trader, November 5, 1892, p. 1, col. 2
  2. The Ottawa Free trader, November 5, 1892, p. 1, col. 3
  3. The Ottawa Free trader, November 5, 1892, p. 3, col. 2
  4. The Ottawa Free trader, November 5, 1892, p. 7, col. 2

A Halloween Horror Story

A DIABOLICAL PLOT
John McWilliams Lying at the Point of Death

POISON IN HIS TEA
He Alleges That His Wife Prepared the Dose in Hopes of Putting Him Out of the Way – He Will Recover and Will Prosecute the Matter

From Friday’s Daily:
One of the most fiendish plots that we have been compelled to chronicle for many a day occurred in this city at noon today. For several days past John McWilliams, a laborer, whose home is in Dayton has been employed on our streets by the Rockford Construction Company. He worked at the Rock Island depot unloading the brick from the cars to the wagons. As stated before, his home is in Dayton, to which place he returned every evening. He carried his dinner with him in the morning and at noon he ate it at the flagman’s house on Columbus street. After quitting work this noon, he went to this little house, as usual, and proceeded to eat his dinner. He carried his tea in a small can, and after drinking probably a half a pint of it, he remarked to some of the men who were with him that the tea had a queer taste and he threw the balance of it away. He soon became sick and was seized with cramps and then became hysterical. Dr. Dyer was sent for and upon examination found that the unfortunate man had drank strychnine in his tea and administered an emetic.

McWilliams was conscious all the time and when questioned by a representative of this paper as to the manner in which the poison was placed in his tea, he had no hesitation in saying that it was the work of his wife and that she was undoubtedly prompted to do so by a married man, who resides in Dayton and with whom she has been very intimate of late. The whole circumstances tended to show that the plot was perpetrated with homicidal intentions and the poisoned man weak as he was stated that it was the work of no one save his wife and her admirer. The matter was reported to State’s Attorney Blake, who immediately issued a warrant for their arrest and the same was placed in the sheriff’s hands for service. At 3 o’clock McWilliams was resting quietly and Sr. Dyer’s opinion is that he will recover. The plot is one that should not go unrecognized by the authorities and the perpetrators should be punished to the fullest extent of the law.1

[Stay tuned. Next week we will see the follow-up to this attempted murder.]


  1. The Ottawa Free Trader, October 29, 1892, p. 5, col. 4

Solomon Channel

Solomon Channel death record

. . . Solomon Channel deceased, left him surviving no widow but left him surviving Joseph R. Channel, whose place of residence if living is unknown, his son and Mary C. Belk, and Sarah Channel, residing in South Ottawa, Illinois, and Melvina P. Mitchell residing at Centralia, Ill, his daughters and Maggie Corsbie only child of Maggie Corsbie a deceased daughter of said Testator residing in Montague, Texas, Jackson Channel a son residing in Dayton Illinois and John W. Channel, this administrator, his only children and heirs at law1

Solomon Channel, and wife, Betsy Wamsley, from Ohio in 1832, settled on N. W. 1/4 S. 12, T. 33, R. 4; sold to A. D. Butterfield, and returned to Ohio, came back to Illinois in 1840 [actually 1850], and died 1875; his wife died before him. He has had seven children. Joseph, now in Iowa; Mary married a Mr. Bell in Adams; Malvina; Alva, is dead; Sarah, John, and Jackson, are single.2

Solomon Channel, b 5 July 1800; d 5 March 18753
Betsy Channel, b 1811, d 27 October 18653
Alva Sea Channel, b 1833, d 15 August 18543
Samuel A. Channel, b 1850, d 28 August 18543

John W. Channel, b 1849, has been covered elsewhere on this site; see his biography and his cemetery record.

See this well-sourced Ancestry tree for more information on the children.


  1. Solomon Channel probate file, 1876, box C, file 173, La Salle County Genealogy Guild, 115 W. Glover St., Ottawa, Illinois
  2. Elmer Baldwin, History of La Salle County, Illinois (Chicago: Rand, McNally & Co., 1877), p. 283.
  3. FindAGrave entries, Daniels Cemetery, Ottawa, LaSalle County, Illinois.

 

Autumn in Dayton 143 Years Ago

 

Rural Happenings

            Dayton, Oct. 2, 1879. – The past few days have been quite warm, in fact uncomfortably so. But then winter is not far away, for –

“Summer is gone on swallow’s wings,
And Earth has buried all her flowers;
No more the lark, – the linnet – sings,
But Silence sits in faded bowers.

There is a shadow on the plain
Of Winter ere he comes again, –
There is in woods a solemn sound
Of hollow warnings whispered round,

As Echo in her deep recess
For once had turned a prophetess.
Shuddering Autumn stops to list,
And breathes his fear in sudden sighs,
With clouded face, and hazel eyes
That quench themselves, and hide in mist.”

J. B. Jennings has rented the Exchange to Mr. James Timmons and has moved to his farm in Iowa.

Mr. Anson Spencer’s family have gone to Texas to seek health and a new home. Mr. S. will soon follow them.

John G. Dunavan and family of Rutland, have made Dayton their home

O. W. Trumbo and family were visiting friends in Chicago last week.

Mr. Silas Dunavan, son of G. M. Dunavan, Esq., and who has spent the past fifteen years in the west, has returned home for a brief visit.

Mr. John Green departed Tuesday for a few days visit, – with the big pumpkins and squashes, of course, – at the Wenona Union Fair.

Nearly a dozen of our people visited your city last Tuesday evening to hear the wonderful Remenyi. With one exception they returned well pleased with the concert, and voted Remenyi a first class artiste.
[Remenji, a Hungarian violinist, gave a concert in Ottawa on September 30, with over 400 in the audience. I wonder who the lone dissenter was.]

Rev. Sophie Gibb of Sheriden delivered an excellent discourse at the school house last Sabbath evening.

Rev. G. B. Barnes of Ottawa preached to the Dayton people last week. Mr. Barnes, we understand, will give his views on “Universalism” at his next appointment.

Mr. Andrew Rhoads left us Wednesday for a visit to Kansas.

Messrs. William Stadden and Walter Trumbo, who have been out west examining the farming lands of Nebraska, returned home last Friday.

Green Bros. have just finished burning another fine lot of tile.

The woolen mills are turning out some fine flannels and blankets. Being the genuine article, made of all wool, they are in good demand.

Occasional1


  1. The Ottawa Free Trader, October 4, 1879, p. 8, col. 1

A Lawn Social and Concert

David Green house in 1907

The home of Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Dallam

One hundred and fifty people attended a lawn social given at the home of Mrs. E. A. Dallam in Dayton Friday evening. A program of unusual merit was rendered, and Ottawa people were among the principal participants in the entertainment. The hours were from 8 until 11 o’clock, and ice cream and cake were served. The Ladies’ Aid society of Dayton assisted Mrs. Dallam as hostess, and $25.00 were cleared, which amount will go towards the sidewalk fund. The following program was rendered:

Selection – Orchestra, composed of Miss Ida C. Chamberlin, of Ottawa, Miss Boyd, of Grand Ridge, and Messrs. Belrose and Chamberlin, of Wedron.

Vocal solo – Miss Anna O’Meara, of Ottawa.

Violin solo – Miss Boyd.

Solo – Miss Buckley.

Violin solo – Miss Boyd.

Vocal solo – Miss Chamberlin.

Vocal solo – Merle Haight, of Ottawa

Selection – Orchestra1

Miss Ida Chamberlin, orchestra member here in 1913, was the music teacher at the Dayton school when I was in Miss Fraine’s room about 1946 or 47. 


  1. The Ottawa Free Trader, July 18, 1913, p. 8, col. 3

A Rough Spot in a Marriage – and an Unexpected Ending

On September 29, 1881, Alice Virginia Furr married Edward Joseph Ward in Dayton. She was the daughter of Squire and Mary (Bruner) Furr. He was the son of Fenton and Mary (?) Ward. Although he lists his mother’s name as Mary Clemens in this marriage application, the 1842 La Salle County marriage of Fenting [sic] Ward lists his wife’s name as Mary Cofield. Further investigation is needed on this.

The marriage was performed in Ottawa by Charles F. W. O’Neill, Catholic Priest.

They had three children:

Mary Elizabeth, born April 28, 1883, in Dayton township; married Robert J. W. Briggs September 12, 1905, in Ottawa, Illinois; died September 24, 1948.

William Albert Ward, born April 25, 1885, in Dayton township; died August 4th, 1967, in Warm Springs, Montana. He never married.

Carrie E., born 6 May 1887, in Dayton township; married Oakley Wright Esmond December 23, 1908, in Dayton; died February 1981 in Ottawa.

After 12 years and four children, the marriage was in trouble, and in January 1893 Alice sued for divorce, as reported by the Free Trader –

Mrs. Alice V. Ward’s Case to be Tried Tomorrow Morning

The somewhat sensational divorce case of Mrs. Alice V. Ward, of Dayton, four miles northeast of Ottawa, against her husband, Edward J. Ward, will be placed on trial before Judge Blanchard and a jury at 9 o’clock tomorrow morning.

Mrs. Ward, who is the daughter of the late Justice Furr, alleges that she has been a true and dutiful wife to her husband, but that she is no longer able to bear his name because of his drunkenness and general worthlessness.1

But the next day we find the following:

CIRCUIT CIVIL CASES
The Ward divorce case, from Dayton, was not placed on trial this morning, as the defendant, Ward, withdrew his contest and allowed his wife to secure her divorce by default. Mayo & Widmer, attys.2

In 1893, divorce was available only for a very limited number of causes. Many divorces that told of cruelty or bad behavior could have been an agreement between two people who wanted to end the marriage, but had no legal grounds for divorce. The fact that Mr. Ward did not contest the action suggests that he was a willing partner to the divorce.

The divorce does appear to be amicable, as Edward and three of the children – Mary, William, and Carrie – are found in 1900, living with Alice’s mother and brothers. Alice has not been located in 1900. In 1910 both Alice and Edward are listed as divorced. In 1920 Edward claims to be a widower.

But that is not the end of the story. In 1921 the following appeared in The Free Trader:

DAYTON COUPLE ARE QUIETLY MARRIED

Miss Alice Ward and E. J. Ward, both of Dayton, were quietly married Saturday at high noon at the home of Rev. and Mrs. J. L. Vonckx at his home in this city.3

I don’t know if this time was happier. I hope so.

Note that this time they were married by a Protestant minister.

Edward died in Dayton on December 26, 1931. Alice died in Ottawa on June 24, 1935, at her daughter’s home. Both are buried in the Dayton Cemetery.


  1. The Ottawa Free Trader, 28 Jan 1893, p7, col 1
  2. ibid, 28 Jan 1893, p5, col 2
  3. ibid, 10 Oct 1921, p. 3, col. 4

Report from the adventurers

One of the best parts of having a public website is hearing from strangers who have landed here via Google. Recently, I got an email from someone who had found two documents in her deceased father’s estate that meant nothing to her or her family. She did not know why he had them, but she read them, got interested, and Googled the people mentioned. She sent me copies of the items – they are typed transcriptions of 2 letters from Jesse Green, on the trail to California in 1849, to his brother David at home in Dayton. These are not the original letters and why and where the transcripts were made is unknown. It is possible neither letter ever reached Dayton, as the family treasured the letters from Jesse and preserved them carefully, but neither of these two new letters appear in the family collection. Here is the first, written on the way to California. (The map is one I made for a program for the Dayton Cemetery Association.)

SELF ENVELOPE

Ham Iowa
Sept 6 1849                                  10 [cents postage]
Mr. David Green
Dayton
La Salle County
Illinois

25 Miles East of South Pass
June 28th 1849

Dear Brother – Wife & All
Here we are within 25 miles of the S. P. and have met with an express for the States and write a few lines whilst our train is going on. We have reached this point without any difficulty. All well with the exception of diarhea. I have had it badly but am perfectly over it. Wm. (or Mr.) Goodrich & Wiley are complaining some at this time of the same complaint.

We divided our Company about two weeks since on account of the scarcity of grass for so large a train. We have ten of the wagons of the original Company together now. We find grass our only hindrance but have kept our cattle in good condition thus far and hope we have passed over the greatest scarcity. We have gained some on the crowd ahead of us – the first Ox teams are from 3 to 4 days ahead of us and number about 500 and probably 1000 mule teams but what the large number behind us are to do for feed the lord only knows, for 3 or 4 days past we have seen large numbers of oxen dead, that was killed by the sabulous or alkaline water. We have been very cautious about keeping our cattle from those places and have not lost any since we started. Our wagons are standing it well and nothing to complain of, but we are getting along much better that could possible be expected. We had been calculating to celebrate the 4th on South Pass but will pass by before that time and of course will not stop in this crowd. There is frequently 200 wagons in sight of the same encampment. Health generally on the route good – no cholera nor any fatal sickness. We have not heard from home since we left. If you have not already written us at San Francisco do so immediately as it is the only place we can get them. I hope you have escaped the cholera and all are well. I have not time to write more, be not uneasy if you hear of great suffering on the route as I think we are safe. O that I could hear from you all and especially Byron.
As ever in haste
Jesse Green1

Note that, although the letter was written when the company was within 25 miles of South Pass, the letter was actually mailed from Iowa. The emigrants would take every opportunity to give a letter to someone headed east, for them to mail when they reached a post office.


  1. From a typed transcription of the letter, found in the estate of G. Stanley Smith.

News of Dayton – September 1900

 

DAYTON

The dance given by the Woodmen on Friday evening last for the benefit of one of their members, was well attended, and about $26 was realized.

Nelson Plumb, of Streator, was a visitor here on Tuesday.

The youngest child of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Clodt is very sick at this writing.

The older mill is doing a good business, and everything is lively around there.

A farewell party was given Mr. and Mrs. Miles Masters on Saturday night last, about fifty guests being present from Dayton, Wedron and Ottawa. Refreshments were served after which the host and hostess were presented with a very fine oil painting.

Mrs. H. S. Ladd, who has been visiting Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Ladd returned to her home on Wednesday at Rising City, Neb.

Miss Brennan, who has been a guest of Mr. and Mrs. McBrearty for some time, returned to Chicago Wednesday.

Miss Carrie Ward, while visiting Luther Furr and wife, of Brookfield, met with a painful, but not serious, accident on Friday last. While riding a horse a plank in the bridge broke throwing both horse and rider. Miss Ward at first thought nothing serious of the accident, and did not complain for a day or two, but finally called on Dr. Pettit, who informed her that her shoulder was dislocated, and advised her to go to the hospital at once, where she was given chloroform and the injury reset. She is resting easy at this writing.

Two new members were initiated in the Woodmen lodge last evening.

The brick mill is shut down for a few days undergoing repairs.

Mrs. James O’Meara is quite sick. Dr. Butterfield is in attendance.

Mrs. Jackson Channel is ill at her home.

Lyle Green has just finished putting up 100 tons of silo for winter use.

The grave yard is being mowed and put in shape.

We are so busy making cider it is hard for me to do justice to our Dayton items.

Daytonian.1


  1. The (Ottawa) Republican-Times, September 20, 1900, p. 4, cols. 4-5

An Early Dayton Wedding, but just WHEN did it take place?

MARRIED – On the 4th of March last, at Dayton, Illinois, by W. L. Dunavan, Esq. Mr. William Lewis to Miss Eliza Ann D. Holdman, all of this county.

The above announcement appeared in the Free Trader on April 24, 1841. The date given for the marriage is more than a month previous, but perhaps the word didn’t reach the newspaper in a timely fashion.

However, the actual request for a marriage license was filed on April 3rd, 1841 in the county clerk’s office, as shown below. The newspaper, apparently, was off by a month.

To make matters worse, Wm. L. Dunavan, Justice of the Peace who performed the ceremony, says that he married them on May 4th. However, he recorded the said marriage on April 17th, 1841.

Both documents agree that the marriage was performed on the 4th day of the month. They just can’t agree on which month – the newspaper says March and the JP says May. In fact, based on the date of application (April 3) and the date of registration of the JP’s return (April 17), the marriage must have been performed on April 4.

MORAL: Be careful: any record can have errors. 


  1. The Illinois Free Trader, April 24, 1841, p 3, col 3

Another Dayton Wedding

 

Society’s Doings

Miss May Trumbo, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. M. P. Trumbo, of Dayton, and Mr. Edgar B. Bradford, second son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Bradford, of Ottawa, were married at the elegant home of the bride’s parents in the town of Dayton, at eight o’clock on Wednesday evening, Rev. Gilbert Frederick officiating.

The spacious parlors were tastefully and handsomely decorated with cut flowers, festoons and banks of flowers. At eight o’clock the guests ceased conversation, and the bridal party proceeded down the staircase and assumed positions facing the doors. Mr. Chas, E. Hook acted as best man and Miss Susie Rhoades as bridesmaid. The bride wore white faille silk, demi-train, with drapings of Duchess lace, and pearl ornaments, and Miss Rhoades wore cream surah silk and diamonds. The ushers were Messrs. W. J. Graham, Geo. M. Trimble, A. S. Hook, and Dr. Butterfield.

When the ceremony was concluded, congratulations were followed by an elegant wedding supper, followed by music and more congratulations, Mr. and Mrs. Bradford leaving on the three o’clock train for Chicago.

Among those present were Wm. Bradford and wife, F. Trumbo and wife, Chas. Angevine and wife, W. C. Riale and wife, C. K. Smith and wife (N. Y.), D. M. Hall and wife, A. E. Beach and wife, J. R. Shaver and wife, Charles Cracraft and wife, Judge and Mrs. Blanchard, Charles Neubert and wife (Kansas City), W. W. Nash and wife, L. M. Hess and wife, James Milligan, jr., and wife, C. B. Hess and wife, L. E. Porter and wife, T. E. Mackinlay and wife, I. N. Beem and wife, Gibson Strawn and wife, George W. Yentzer and wife, Capt. and Mrs. Blanchard, L. Leland and wife, George Debolt and wife and W. Van Etten and wife; Mesdames Hook, Fuller (Chicago), and Davidson (Connelsville, Penn.), and Mitchell; Misses Mayo, Finley, Brady (Chicago), Mitchell, Blanchard, Clara and Bertha Angevine, Griffith, Trimble, Rhoades, Porter, Nellie and Kate Bradford, and Kagy (Chicago); and Messrs. Hook, Hamilton, Trimble, Hess, Cary, hall (Chicago), Angevine and Sam, Tom and C. B. Bradford.1


  1. The Ottawa [Ill] Free Trader, September 21, 1889, p. 4, col. 5

Oliver H. and Martha Ellen (Hite) Thompson

On the 31st of May, 1898, Oliver Thompson and Martha Hite appeared at the La Salle County Clerk’s office in Ottawa to apply for a marriage license. Oliver signed an affidavit that both of them were of legal age to marry.

Oliver was twenty-eight and Martha twenty-four. They then completed the application for a marriage license.

Oliver H. Thompson was a clerk, residing in Ottawa. He was Norwegian, born in La Salle County, the son of Bergo and Martha (Johnson) Thompson. It was his first marriage.

Martha E. Hite was the daughter of James M. Hite and his wife, Martha M. Jones. She also was born in La Salle County. It was her first marriage.

The following day, June 1, 1898, they were married in Wedron.

The witnesses were Burton M. Thompson, Oliver’s brother, and Elsie Hite, Martha’s sister. The ceremony was performed by L. C. Burling, pastor of the Sheridan Methodist Episcopal Church.

And here is a picture of the happy couple!

Oliver and Martha Ellen Thompson

There Seems to be Some Disagreement Here

Not the 1887 event, but the river was never tame in the winter.

The Ottawa [Illinois] Free Trader, February 12, 1887, p. 4, col. 6
From Dayton
Dayton, Ill., Feb. 11th, 1887. – The little Fox became the raging Ohio during the flood of last Tuesday. Never since 1857 have we had such a heavy run of water and ice. The ice commenced running Tuesday morning, and run two hours; just before noon it run two hours, and in the evening it run five hours, making nine hours, run. And contrary to the usual manner, the last ice running, instead of being the lightest, was the heaviest, some of it being two feet thick. The fish chute was carried out, but no damage was done to the dam. One of the gates at the locks was broken, and the feeder bank was washed nearly through for quite a distance. The water was so high it ran over the locks and the surrounding embankment. The trestle work of the second span of the new bridge was carried away Monday night, and during the heavy run of ice Tuesday evening, the stone were all knocked out of the noses of the piers, leaving them in a very battered condition. The water alongside of the piers was nearly twenty feet deep. The paper mill lost six hundred dollars worth of straw, which is quite a loss to them, as it is difficult to replace it at this time of year, on account of the bad roads.

The Ottawa [Illinois] Free Trader, February 19, 1887, p. 1, col. 4
Please Rise and Explain
The managers of canal affairs in this city have provoked the ire of divers and sundry of our manufacturers here, by either gross inattention to their duties or a want of due knowledge thereof, as follows:

On Sunday last an ice gorge occurred in the river and feeder of the canal at Dayton, and soon the waters there were on a level – formed a “pool,” and threatened to do considerable damage. On Sunday evening the ice broke away and the waters subsided. Then the waters in the canal were let out, why, no one knows, as all danger was then over. The canal remained dry four days, during which every manufactory in Ottawa whose power is supplied by water was idle. The canal and feeder banks were all sound and no repairs were needed, and none have been made. This withdrawing of the water and stopping the factories, as figured by the proprietors of the different establishments, resulted in damage as follows:
Victor and City Mills, per day, $70; H. C. Strawn, $10; Tile Works, $250; Weis & Wolf, $10; King, $10; Koeppler, $15; Colwell and Rugg, and the Electric Light Co., not reported. Result, a loss of $865 a day, or $1,460, to the factories that have been heard from.

The State of Illinois or its servants ought to make good this loss, in the absence of a satisfactory explanation.

The Ottawa [Illinois] Free Trader, February 26, 1887, p. 8, cols. 2-3
From Dayton
Dayton, Feb. 24. – The slush ice is slowly cutting away out of the river, but large banks of it twelve feet thick remain upon the shores. The mills all got started up again this week.

Your valuable paper last week, in an article under the heading of “Please Rise and Explain,” publishes some things in regard to the shutting out of water from the feeder and canal, which your reporter obtained from a very unreliable source, for there is hardly a word of truth in the whole article. Our manufacturers and citizens who witnessed the flood of the 18th all agree in saying that the canal authorities acted wisely in closing down the gates and thus preventing much greater damage than was actually done; and it is but just to those in authority to state the true facts. Your article stated that “on Sunday evening the ice broke away and the waters subsided.” Now, this is not true, for although the waters subsided a few feet, yet the ice did not break away, but, on the contrary, the ice remained in the same dangerous condition as it was on Sunday, and a fall of temperature, bringing down more slush ice on Monday, would have made the situation more dangerous than on Sunday. Your article further states, “Then the waters in the canal were let out, why, no one knows, as all danger was then over.” As a matter of fact, the water in the feeder and canal was let out about nine o’clock Sunday morning, and a messenger on horseback was dispatched to the canal authorities warning them of the danger to the banks. A gang of the state’s men watched the feeder banks all night Sunday ready to cut it and let the water back into the river again should the danger increase. Again we quote “The canal remained dry four days, during which every manufactory in Ottawa whose power is supplied by water was idle.” Sunday, when the current of the river was forced by the slush ice into the feeder, an ice jam was formed which completely shut off all the water and forced it over the banks into the river again. Tuesday morning, when it was thought the danger was over for the present, the lock gates were raised, and as much water was let in as could be forced through the ice jam. It required two or three days to cut out the ice, and the feeder and canal were being filled as rapidly as possible. If the gates had been left up during the flood there is no question but that a large amount of the bank would have been washed out, which would have taken at least two weeks to repair. Then, let us figure what the damage would have been to the Ottawa manufacturers had the canal authorities not taken the precautions they did: Victor and City Mills, $70 per day, 12 days, $840; H. C. Strawn, $10 per day, for two weeks, $120; Tile Works, $250 per day, for two weeks, $3,000; Weiss & Wolf, $10 per day, for two weeks, $120; King, $10 per day, for 12 days, $120; Koeppler, $15 per day, for 12 days, $180. Result, an actual loss of $1,460 – a probable loss of $4,380, leaving to the credit of the canal authorities $2,920 by reason of their taking such precautions as they did.
Occasional

The Ottawa [Illinois] Free Trader, March 5, 1887, p. 4, cols. 5-6
The Freshet and the Canal
Ottawa, Ill., March 3, 1887
Messrs. Editors: – As “Occasional” has charged in your issue of Feb 26th that the statements made in your issue of Feb. 19th were nearly every word false; and as those statements were obtained from me, in an interview with your reporter, I feel that I ought to reply briefly to the wholesale charge of falsehood.

I visited Dayton Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday following the overflow of the canal bank at Dayton, on Sunday, the 13th of February last. I examined and inspected the canal banks, lock and floodgates each day; and I hereby declare and affirm that not a cent’s worth of damage was done to the canal banks or canal property at Dayton at that overflow, either Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday, the day they finally let in the water. Nor was there one cent’s worth of work done nor material furnished or used for any repairs to the canal during that time at that place for any damage done the canal by the overflow of the Fox river into the canal.
The canal authorities declared to me Tuesday morning, standing on the bridge at Dayton, that there was no damage done to the canal.
Now, will Mr. “Occasional” inform me, or the public, why the water could not have been let into the canal as soon, at least, as its authorities were informed that no damage was done, and that no repairs were needed.

“Occasional” says that some water was let in on Tuesday. That may be true; but I measured the water in the lock at the head of the feeder every day, – Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, – and the water was twenty inches lower Thursday morning than Wednesday morning; so that if the gates were opened Tuesday, they must have been closed again.

“Occasional” says that the State men watched the banks all night Sunday night, and at the same time admits that the ice gorge broke below the dam, in the river, Sunday night and that the water went down. But he neglects to inform us that on Monday (notwithstanding, as he says, the danger was over) they did cut the feeder bank more than one mile below where the overflow was and when there was no water in the canal and no prospect of any. And this large hole was cut in the narrowest part of the bank and where, if a washout could have been furnished to the invitation thus made and kept open three full days (for it was not refilled until Thursday, I think it would have been later than the next planting time before the bank would have been rebuilt. “occasional,” especially in the Ottawa Republican, is very full in his charge of falsehood, but still follows each charge with an admission of facts stated in the Free Trader of the 19th of February. He says, if the weather should change, &c., &c.; as well he might say, if we should have a June freshet, or if some other awful thing should happen, it was safe to wait and see.
The canal authority that would shut the water out of the canal and keep it out for four days and cut a large hole in the canal bank and keep it open three days as a precaution against what may happen in the future, is no doubt a very prudent authority.

And now, if “Occasional” will point out, over his own signature, where one cent’s worth of damage was done to the canal on account of the overflow, or where, during the time between Sunday and Thursday, one cent’s worth of repairs was made by the canal authorities on account of the damage done by the overflow, that shall be the truth, then I will confess that I am wrong. Until that is done, no matter how many times you charge me with falsehood, the facts as stated must stand for the truth.

No, Mr. “Occasional,” the conduct up there at that time is consistent with the conduct here daily. There is hardly a day but the water in the main canal is anywhere from ten to twenty inches below navigation stage. That, Mr. Authority knows full well, taken from a six-foot head, well nigh destroys the power on that head. And all, as Mr. Authority says, because he will take no chances.
Once more, if, as “Occasional” says, it was true that an ice bar was formed across the feeder below the gates so that no water could pass if the gates were open, then, in the name of common sense, why were the State men set at work Monday cutting the canal bank one mile down the feeder, where there was no water and none could be got if his statement was true? There is an adage, that “of all men, liars ought to have good memories,” – or ought to have reason enough to see where their statements convict themselves.
Respectfully, Wm. Thomas

The Ottawa [Illinois] Free Trader, March 12 [printed; actually 19], 1887, p. 2, col. 5
The Dayton Flood Again
Dayton, March 3, 1887 – On your last issue Mr. William Thomas, an old citizen of Ottawa, came out in a lengthy article admitting that he is the author of the unjust criticisms on the action of the canal authorities, and charging your correspondent with telling falsehoods. Our citizens and manufacturers feel that Mr. Thomas has very much misrepresented the facts in this matter and desire that we should answer his article and place the facts again correctly before the public.
Why should we write anything but the truth when we are a user of the water at this place and a loser by the shutting out of the water? We are also your reporter for this vicinity and always try to give your paper nothing but the facts, and we know that we are supported by the citizens here who were eye-witnesses of the overflow, in saying that we have given the facts correctly in the matter.

In Mr. Thomas’ whole article he does not (and cannot) deny the points we made, viz.: of the danger during Sunday and Monday, Feb. 13th and 14th of a wholesale destruction of the banks, and of the fact that the canal was filled as rapidly as the water could force its way through the ice jam. There can be no denial of these facts.

Mr. Thomas charges that we admitted that the ice gorge broke below the dam Sunday night. Why does he say this, when in our last correspondence dated Feb. 24th, this was one of the points which we most emphatically denied. We claimed that the ice remained in the same dangerous condition on Monday as on Sunday.

Mr. Thomas claims that on Tuesday morning the canal authorities declared to him, standing on the bridge at Dayton, that no damage was done to the canal. We were present during that conversation, as were also three or four more responsible witnesses who testify to the same thing, and heard the canal supt. say that he did not know what damage was done to the banks. How could he tell when the ice was piled up all over the banks? Mr. Thomas acknowledged during the conversation on the bridge, that he had been up trying to examine the banks but as he had no shovel to clear away the ice, he could not tell the condition of the banks.

In regard to the big hole in the bank, he states was cut on Monday. These are the facts: the canal authorities thought the danger so great that they employed the bridgemen who were idle that day to cut the frost out of the bank below the paper mill, so that in case the river raised again and overflowed the banks, the bank could be quickly and easily cut and the water turned into the river again, and the canal would not be given more water than it could dispose of. It was not safe to cut the bank any nearer the locks as the river was too high.

We have never said or claimed that any damage was done to the banks at this time, but these are the facts: during the heavy run of ice of Feb. 8th the banks near the dam were cut about one-half through for a distance of nearly 100 feet, and the states’ men were two or three days repairing them, but the banks were still weak, however, when the flood of the 13th came on and it was only by a narrow escape that they were preserved. Instead of finding fault, Mr. Thomas should feel thankful that his electric light was not dimmed for three months instead of three days.

In regard to the measurements which he states he made at the lock, we have responsible witnesses who testify that at no time was the water more than fourteen inches low at the locks and that more water was being let in every day than could force its way through the ice jam.
We have interviewed a few of our prominent citizens and give you their opinions: A. F. Dunavan, Esq., of the Horse Collar Works, says he feels confident that the authorities did the proper thing in shutting out the water on that Sunday, and that there was great danger to the banks by the overflow. His factory was laid idle for a few days, but he feels confident that his loss would have been much greater had not the canal authorities shut out the water. J. W. Channel, of the Tile Works, says he is positive the authorities did perfectly right in shutting out the water, and that any one who would have seen the condition of the river at the dam at that time could not have a different opinion. He was an eye witness of the overflow. He had lived in Dayton a good many years, and never saw the water in as dangerous a condition to the banks as on that Sunday and Monday.
O. W. Trumbo who has lived here 30 years says he never saw the water so high. Mr. D. Moore of the paper mill thinks the authorities did the proper thing, as do Mr. Davis and Green Bros.
Occasional

————————————- AND THAT’S THAT, SO THERE!!

Charlotte Lyman Rogers

Charlotte Rodgers’ [sic: Rogers] entry in 1860 mortality census for Dayton

Charlotte (Lyman) Rogers was born about 1836 in Ohio. She was the daughter of John West Lyman from Charlotte, Vermont, and an unknown first wife,  John came to La Salle county, in 1838, and bought the NW quarter of section 24 in Freedom township. He married his second wife, Jerusha Newcomb, March 18, 1840, in La Salle county.

In the 1850 census, Charlotte Lyman, 14,  is found in the household of John W. Lyman, Freedom township. Also in the 1850 census, Thomas Rogers, 11, appears in the household of Jeremy W. Rogers, farmer in Dayton township.

On February 3, 1857, Charlotte Lyman and Thomas Rogers applied for a marriage license. Charlotte was over 18 and therefore of legal age to marry, but Thomas was only 19 and had to file an affidavit that his parents knew about the engagement and gave their permission for the marriage. They were married two days later, on February 5th. The marriage was performed by John Read, J. P., in La Salle county, Illinois.

Thomas Rogers swears that his parents know of his engagement and consent to his marriage.

Charlotte and Thomas had two children:
• A daughter Charlotte, called Lottie, born November 15, 1857.
• A son, Charles E. born August 14, 1859.
Charlotte died of typhoid fever in March 1860, when Charles was still an infant.

Lottie Rogers married Abner White February 28, 1875 in Kankakee, Illinois.
She died December 24, 1910 in Ames, Story Co, Iowa.

Charles Rogers died 10 July 1935 in San Gabriel, Los Angeles, California.

Rebecca Emma (Headley) (Morrison?) (Wight) McBrearty

Rebecca Emma Headley was born June 15, 1849, in Bureau county, Illinois, the daughter of John and Anna (Johnson) Headley. John died about 1854. In 1860 Rebecca is living with her mother in Ohio township, Bureau county, where they are also found in 1865.

Rebecca was married at age 21, to Francis Marion Wight, on the 18th of April 1870, in Red Oak, Montgomery County, Iowa. She was listed on the marriage documents as Rebecca Morrison, implying that she was married previously. Also, in the 1870 census of Francis and Rebecca’s household, there is a baby girl named Minnie Morrison, born Feb 1870. No evidence has been found of a marriage to Morrison, nor any trace of Minnie after 1870.

Rebecca and Francis had a daughter, Mary, born in October 1875, and a son, Roy, born about 1881. She was divorced from Wight March 12, 1885 in Lee County, Illinois.

Rebecca was married to James McBrearty, 11 July 1885 in Dixon, Lee County, Illinois. James worked for the C. B. & Q. railroad. His job took them to La Grange and Western Springs before moving to Dayton in May 1899.

Note that her name, “Wight”, is mistakenly written as White.

Mary was 10 and Roy 4 when their mother married James. Both children then used their stepfather’s surname.

In the 1900 census, Rebecca and James are living with her daughter Mary, now Mrs. Edward Emmons, in Dayton. In 1910 she and James are in their own household. Grandson Edward Emmmons lives with them.

Rebecca died January 18, 1917 in Joliet and was buried January 21 in the Dayton cemetery.

Her obituary may be seen here.

A Flying Visit – Dayton, Ohio to Dayton, Illinois

AIRPLANE IS USED TO PAY VISIT TO DAYTON

Richard Whitehouse, a former Dayton resident, and Russell A. Moore, owner of Moore’s Flying Service of Dayton, Ohio, visited friends in the village of Dayton for an hour this morning. They flew here in one of Moore’s planes, landing at 8 o’clock near the Lyle Green residence, and then took off an hour later, expecting to be home by noon.
Whitehouse was formerly herdsman of Green’s Jersey herd, and is now a student flyer with 25 hours of solo flying to his credit.


The clipping above comes from the family scrapbook kept by Maud Green, Dayton historian. The item appeared on June 27, 1933, most likely in the Ottawa newspaper. She noted how it compared with the 35 day trip the Green party made from Ohio in 1829. 


Richard Francis Whitehouse was born March 31, 1895 in Auburn, Maine. In 1917 he was living in the Dayton, Ohio, area, working for the Foreman Dairy Farm. He was employed at various places in the dairy business and it may be around this time that he worked for Lyle Green.  On June 24, 1919, he married Nellie (Skinner) Hurless in Van Wert County, Ohio. By 1930 he was manager of a dairy farm and in 1942, when he registered for the draft, he was a manager at the Borden Finch Jersey Farms in Dayton, Ohio. He died August 25, 1957, in Athens, Texas.