Edward C. McClary

The McClary house as it looks today

The McClary house in Dayton, as it looks today

[the following was written in 1906]

Edward C. McClary is proprietor of a grocery store in the village of Dayton, which he has conducted for ten years, and is also grain buyer for the Neola Elevator Company of Chicago, which has an elevator in this village situated on the Aurora and Streator branch of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy railroad. He was born in the village of Norway, La Salle county, on the 18th of August, 1874, and is therefore yet a young man, but has achieved a success which many an elder business man might well envy.

His father, Thomas McClary, a native of Ohio, was married to Miss Susan Ingals, who was born in Indiana. A carpenter by trade, he also engaged in connection  with building operations in the repair of wagons and farm tools. He came to this county about fifty years ago and was married after his arrival here. He first lived in the village of Norway until about thirty-one years ago, when he removed to Sheridan, his remaining days being passed there. He never sought to figure prominently in politics and for a number of years gave his political allegiance to the prohibition party, but became an advocate of the republican party at the time that James G. Blaine was its presidential candidate. Although he belonged to no church he lived an upright, honorable life, doing by others as he would have them do to him, was a strict temperate man and displayed in his daily conduct those sterling traits of character which everywhere command respect and confidence. He passed away in June, 1904, at the age of seventy-three years and his widow is still living in Sheridan at the age of sixty-five years.

In their family were six children, five of whom yet survive: Lizzie, the wife of H. M. Powers, a resident of Sheridan; Ella, who is a nurse in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania; Frank W., who married Rose Marco and is a stock buyer living in Sheridan; Rose, the wife of E. H. Peterson, of Sheridan, who has twice represented the district in the state legislature and is one of the prominent and influential residents of La Salle county; Edward C., of this review; and James, who died at the age of five years.

In his parents’ home Edward C. McClary spent his boyhood days and acquired his education in the public schools.Ten years ago he purchased the grocery store of C. W. Fredenburg and has since conducted the business, meeting with well merited success. He carries a carefully selected line of staple and fancy groceries and his neat and attractive store secures a liberal patronage.

In July, 1899, Mr. McClary was married to Miss Emma F. Barnes, who was born in this county, December 11, 1872, and is a daughter of Joseph Barnes, who is living in Dayton township. Mr. McClary has been influential in community affairs and has co-operated actively as well as effectively in many measures that have had direct bearing upon the welfare of the town. Since 1897 he has been postmaster of Dayton and is now serving his third term as township treasurer. His political allegiance is given to the republican party and he is a member of the Modern Woodmen camp at Wedron. Investigation into his life record shows his fidelity to honorable, manly principles, and he is an intelligent, energetic young man, spoken of in favorable terms throughout the community.1


  1. U. J. Hoffman, Past and Present of La Salle County (Chicago, The S. J. Clarke Publishing Co, 1906), 485-486

To the East by Steamer

Cleveland Daily Herald (Cleveland, Ohio), Tuesday, October 12, 1841

Among the passengers on the Steamer De Witt Clinton in October 1941 was Jesse Green, of Dayton, Illinois. It is very likely that he was traveling east to acquire machinery or supplies for their new woolen mill. He was traveling in style, as you may see by the description below.

STEAMBOAT LAUNCH. – The fine new steamboat DE WITT CLINTON, was to be launched from the ship yard of Captain F. Church, at Huron, on Saturday last. She is a first class boat, 500 tons burthen, built for the Troy & Erie Line, and will be commanded by by Capt. Byram H. Squires. This is the second steamboat built in this yard this season.
Buffalo Commercial Advertiser
Monday, July 25, 1836 p.2, c.4

The DE WITT CLINTON, which left this port yesterday afternoon for Buffalo, is a new and handsome steam freight boat. She is 147 feet in length, 27 feet beam about 48 feet on the guards, and 11 feet depth of hold. Tonnage registered at 415, but by carpenter’s measure nearer 490. Although built for a freight boat, she is so constructed as to accommodate a goodly number of passengers; there being in the main and forward cabins 72 berths, in the ladies’ cabin 30, and on the promenade deck 8 state-rooms, with 3 berths in each, beside 6 others near the steering wheel, and perhaps 20 more on the main deck, for the hands, &c., being in all about 150. The arrangement of the ladies’ cabin is very convenient being across the deck, with a broad and spacious hall between the ranges of berths. The workmanship of the whole is plain but neat and substantial. The machinery (high pressure) is very powerful.
Cleveland Weekly Advertiser
Thursday, September 15, 1836 p.2 c.6

Steam paddle DeWITT CLINTON. Of 413 tons gross. Built Huron, Ohio, 1836. First home port, Buffalo, N.Y. DISPOSITION. — Lost by stranding 1851.
Merchant Steam Vessels of the United States
The Lytle – Holdcamper List, 1790 to 1868

 

Dayton Woman’s Club Observes Anniversary of Its Founding

Dayton Women's Club meeting

 

Dayton Woman’s Club Observes Anniversary of Its Founding

The Dayton Woman’s club today had started the 26th year of its organization, with memories of the fitting observance yesterday of the silver anniversary of its founding.

The present members of the club, who include many of the 13 charter members, received 100 friends from 3 to 5 p. m. yesterday in the Dayton clubhouses, to mark the anniversary.

Silver and white appointments were used on the tea table from which the guests were served. Daises, calla lilies and white delphinimum [sic] formed a centerpiece. Mesdames Ralph Green and Gilbert Masters poured.

Baskets of flowers were used about the room to create a background for the lovely event.

Piano solos were played by Miss Betty Rensch, a piano duet was played by Mary Louise Varland and Betty Follett, a vocal solo, “June Morning,” was sung by Miss Ida Chamberlain and a violin solo was played by Marjorie Williamson, accompanied by her mother, Mrs. Ernest Williamson.

Painting Given

A painting of Wallace Nutting’s was presented to the club by Mrs. Bert Tuttle in memory of Mrs. Fanie [sic] Osbourne. A tribute was given Mrs. Osbourne by Mrs. E. C. Cleary. The presentation was made to Mrs. Arthur Retz, president of the club.

Of interest to the guests was a picture on exhibit of the home of Mrs. Rush Green, now destroyed by fire, in which the club was organized 25 years ago.

Honored yesterday were the following past presidents of the club: Mesdames Gilbert Masters, Dan Hallowell, Ben Chamberlain, Will Fleming and Miss Maud Green. They were given special badges and also were in the receiving line, as was Miss Jennie Fraine.

Charter Members

Among the 13 charter members of the club present were: Mesdames Masters, Hallowell and Misses Jennie and Emma Fraine.

The guests included Mrs. B. O. Benson of Tampa, Fla., a guest of Mrs. John Smith of Wedron; Mrs. Annie Barnes of Boston, a guest of Miss Jennie Barnes and Mrs. Carrie Green; Mrs. Barbara Masters of Chicago, a guest of Miss Maud Green; Mrs. Emily Brown and daughter Ethel of Oak Park; and others from Ottawa, Grand Ridge, Harding, Wedron and Marseilles.

The celebration was in general charge of Mesdames Charles Clifford, Arthur Retz, Ralph Green, Will Ryan and Misses Jennie and Emma Fraine and Maud Green.

The first meeting of the group in its 26th year will take place Wednesday, June 29, in the club house, which the organization constructed in 1923 and 1924.

The club was founded June 13, 1913, to promote sociability, discuss subjects relating to a betterment of the community and provide amusement and recreation.1


  1. The Ottawa Free Trader, June 15, 1938, p6