Will of Hannah Rebecca (Rhoads) Green

Hannah Rebecca Rhoads, the second wife of Jesse Green

On May 3rd, 1894, Hannah Rebecca (Rhoads) Green signed her will, only a few days before her death on May 23rd. She named her son J. Kent Green as executor and trustee of her estate. He was directed to use the income from the property for her husband, Jesse Green, during his lifetime. If not all the income was needed by Jesse, the trustee was directed to pay off the debt owing on the estate. At the death of her husband, the property was to be divided among her sons, Thomas Henry Green, Joseph Green, James A. Green, Frank Green and J. Kent Green and her grandchildren Ethel May Williams and Frank Roger Williams, children of her deceased daughter, Cora, wife of H. B. Williams.

You can see the full text of the will here.

Marriage of Charles Brown and Minnie Furr

Charles Brown and Minnie Furr on their wedding day
Marriage application

On December 29th, 1890, Charles Brown and Minnie Furr, both of Dayton township, applied for a marriage license. Charles was 24 years old, a butcher, born in Freedom township, son of George R. Brown and Isabella W. Hosford. It was his first marriage.

Minnie was 20 years old, born in Seneca, daughter of Squire Furr and Mary Bruner. It was her first marriage, also.

Marriage Affidavit

Charles Brown filled out the affadavit swearing that they were of age, unmarried, and could legally make a marriage contract.

Marriage License

Patrick Finlen, the county clerk of La Salle County from 1882-1894, filled out the license on the 29th of December, granting permission for the marriage to be celebrated.

N. O. Freeman, minister of the First Methodist Church of Ottawa, performed the ceremony in Dayton on December 31st.

Marriage Certificate

John Samuel Hippard

 

John S. Hippard, who is buried in the Dayton Cemetery, died August 25, 1905, in Dayton Township. He was 29, unmarried and left no will, so his estate went to his siblings. The proof of heirship in the probate papers1 attests to the following relationships:

John Samuel Hippard’s parents, Stephen William and Frances Rebecca Hippard, had 5 children: Charles William, John Samuel, Mary Elizabeth, Jacob Henry, and Frances May.
    Mary Elizabeth died about 1891. She was about 13 years old and unmarried.
    Jacob Henry is unmarried and living with his parents in Dayton township .
    Frances May (Fannie) is married to Newton Conner, living in Wedron in Dayton Township.
    Charles William lives in Dayton township and is the administrator of the estate.

John Samuel, Jacob Henry, and Frances (Conner) Ackerman are all buried in the Dayton Cemetery. See the index on this site.

At his death, John owned no land, and no tangible personal property. His only asset was a health insurance policy which provided that in case of ill health he would be paid $35/month. He had been sick for a little over seven months and was entitled to $223. However, the policy had a clause that in the case of tuberculosis they would pay only one fifth of the amount. John did suffer from tuberculosis, so was not entitled to the full amount The estate negotiated with the insurance company and the claim was settled for $100.

The cost of administration of the estate was $37 and other claims (doctor and funeral costs) came to $125. Thus there was a balance due the administrator of $62 and no funds to pay it, so Charles Hippard petitioned the court to accept the report and declare the estate settled.


  1. John Samuel Hippard probate file, 1905, box 464, file 12, La Salle County Genealogy Guild, 115 W. Glover, Ottawa, IL 61350

It Was Hot 140 Years Ago Today, Too

Rural Happenings1

Dayton, Aug. 3. – Hot, hotter, hottest, 100 in the shade.

The tile works shipped three car loads of tile to Serena this week. They are building up a fine reputation for first class hard drain tile, and have an ever-increasing demand for them.

The vote at the school house last Saturday evening on the question of authorizing the directors to issue bonds for the construction of a new school building, was lost by a small majority. Goodbye, new school house.

Misses Hattie and Belle Brown of Newark, Ill., were visiting Miss Cora Green last week.

A frenchman working on the section had his finger badly mashed while coming home on a late train last Saturday evening. The car door was closed on his finger, and the noise of the train prevented him from being heard until the bone was broken and the finger badly crushed.

Mr. H. B. Williams started last Tuesday on a trip to northern Iowa.

Miss Hattie Edwards, of Mendota, is visiting Miss Cora Green.

Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Hess departed yesterday for Macomb, to attend the golden wedding of a cousin.

Miss Dessie Root closed her school at Wedron last Saturday with a pleasant little picnic in the grove.

The young folks picnicked at Deer Park last week. Notwithstanding the dust and heat they claim to have had a very enjoyable time.

The woolen mill runs a few hours in the evening besides their day’s work.

The river falls quite slowly. A few nice fish are being caught.


  1.  Ottawa Free Trader, August 6, 1881, p. 8, col. 2