Graduates from the Dayton School in 1900

graduation cap & books

The following notice appeared in The Ottawa Journal, July 8, 1900
Graduates of Dayton school: Clyde Channell, Emma Fraine, Edith Olmstead, Mary Ward

What happened to these four young people after they left the Dayton school?

Clyde Wamsley Channell was born in Dayton July 5, 1887, the son of John W. Channel and Josephine Makinson. After attending the University of Illinois for 2 years, he became a surveyor for the railroad. He then tried farming in Minnesota, where he married Carrie McGee on April 5, 1911, in Itasca County, Minnesota.  They moved to Florida by 1930, where he worked for the post office in Arcadia. He died there on February 10, 1957.

Emma Clementine Fraine was the daughter of Charles Fraine and Clemence Petitcolin. She was born in Dayton May 22, 1885 and after two years of additional schooling in Dayton she became a schoolteacher herself. She first taught in a rural school north of Earlville, later going to Waltham Township to teach. She then taught in the Kleiber School northeast of Ottawa and in Grand Ridge. During these years she was busy furthering her own education and taking summer courses at DeKalb. In the year 1907 she was assigned to teach the primary grades in the two-room Dayton school and continued in that capacity until her retirement in 1952. She died in 1959 in California, at the home of her sister-in-law.

Edith May Olmstead was the daughter of Charles H. Olmstead and Anna M. Burgess. She was born February 14, 1886 and following graduation from the Dayton school, she went to Ottawa Township High School, graduating in 1904. She then taught school in the rural schools of the county. She married Edwin Miller about 1918, but the marriage did not last, ending in divorce before 1940. She died in October 1968, and is buried in the Ottawa Avenue Cemetery.

Mary Elizabeth Ward was the daughter of Edward Joseph Ward and Alice Virginia Furr. She was born April 28,1883, in Dayton. After graduating from the Dayton school she went on to 2 years of high school. On September 12th, 1905 she married Robert J. W. Briggs, a veterinarian from Ottawa. His job took them to various locations in South Dakota and Nebraska. They returned to Ottawa when he retired and Mary died there September 24, 1948

Shooting Affair at Dayton – 1869

gunslingerShooting Affair at Dayton

About 6 o’clock P. M., on Wednesday evening, Feb 10th, Elijah Martin, a young man about 19 years of age, was quietly passing through the village of Dayton, in this county, driving a cow and having two or three dogs with him, when Charles Lott, aged about 25 years, meeting him, took out a revolver and shot one of Martin’s dogs. There were some words, and Lott fell to beating Martin, Lott being apparently in liquor. The boy, as soon as released, ran home to get his gun. His parents not allowing him to take it, he ran to a neighbor’s and borrowed a gun, and started in pursuit of Lott. He found him between Isaac Green’s house and barn, and at once fired upon him, but without effect. Lott returned the fire with his revolver, also without effect. Martin, after exploding a cap or two upon his second barrel, (his gun being a common fowling piece) fired a second time, the shot taking effect in the lower part of Lott’s abdomen and upper part of his thighs. Lott fell and was conveyed to his house. The gun being loaded with No. 6 shot, and fired from a distance of 30 yards, the wound can only be dangerous from its peculiar location in the abdomen. Martin’s father and mother were close behind him trying to dissuade him from his purpose as he attacked Lott, but without effect. Lott is having good surgical attendance, and is as yet considered in no danger. Martin is still at large.1


  1. Ottawa Free Trader, February 13, 1869, p. 1, col. 1

Miles Masters (1846-1910)

Masters, Miles

Miles Masters was born December 4, 1846, in Berlin township, Bureau county, Illinois, the son of John and Maria (Belknapp) Masters. He grew up on his father’s farm with his four brothers. On January 31, 1865, he enlisted in company A of the 148th Illinois Infantry at Princeton, Ill. He received his discharge at Tullahoma, Tennessee on June 19, 1865 and returned home to Bureau county, Illinois, where he worked as a miller.

In 1891 he came to Dayton and joined with Mary S. Green, John Green, and A. E. Butters to incorporate as The Dayton Milling and Power Company. In 1894 he purchased and refit the Dayton Mills, advertising “Having purchased and refit the Dayton Mills to a full Roller Process on Wheat, we take this method as one of the means of informing farmers, and the public in general, of our now Superior Facilities for Doing FIRST-CLASS WORK in all BRANCHES of CUSTOM GRINDING.”

Around 1890, he began to show symptoms of mental distress. Association with persons afflicted with spiritualist mania caused him to change from Methodism to spiritualism. His mental condition deteriorated until, in 1901, he was committed to the asylum in Kankakee.

“Mr. Masters has become convinced that reincarnation has taken place – that the spirit of one of the greatest philosophers the world has ever known is now in his body taking the place of his own spirit. He also imagines that he can converse with the dead and living at will – even those in the flesh at a great distance. He also imagines that he has constructed a wonderful invention.”1

He recovered enough to return to his home in Chicago, but in 1906, he was admitted to the Danville Soldiers’ Home. From there, he was transferred in 1907 to the Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Soldiers’ Home. His mania had not abated and an article in the Milwaukee Journal reported that, according to Miles Masters, who called himself “The Creative”, the end of the world was at hand.

“Democracy, Catholicism, Protestantism, Socialism and commercialism and all manner of the first Christian era dispensations are now to be assigned to oblivion.” After relieving himself of this prophecy the Creative volunteered a little information concerning himself and his mission. “I come to you as a man proclaiming the rights of man in fulfilling the creative laws of his being and have spoken as man never spoke before of the oneness and wholeness of God and man. This power has been given me from the higher spiritual spheres and is to last nine years. “2

Miles Masters died January 2, 1910, at the Soldiers’ Home in Milwaukee. He was buried in the Dayton Cemetery on January 5th.


  1. Ottawa Free Trader, 2 Aug 1901, p. 7, cols. 1-2
  2. Milwaukee Journal, 9 Jan 1909, p. 3, cols. 1-2

Married Amid Flowers

                                                             MARRIED AMID FLOWERS

                            A Wedding in Dayton With Many From Ottawa Present

The handsome residence of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Barnes, just across the line into Dayton township, was brilliantly illuminated and beautifully decorated Wednesday eve’g, the event being the marriage ceremony of Miss Carrie L. Barnes and Winfield S. Green, receiving clerk at the Illinois state penitentiary at Joliet. The large parlor, in which the ceremony took place, was decorated with smilax, ferns and sweet peas and carnations, and was crowded with the guests who were present to witness the ceremony. It was performed at 8:30, Rev. T. C. Matlack, of Joliet, chaplain of the penitentiary, officiating at the event. The groom was supported by S. M. Ahern, of Joliet, as best man, and the bridesmaids were Misses Kittie Shaver, Etta Barnes, Maud Pickens and Emma Barnes, with little Lucille Ribbs as flower girl. The bridal couple entered to the music of Mendelssohn’s wedding march, rendered by Miss Addie Warner, and during the ceremony Thomas’ mandolin orchestra rendered a very pretty wedding serenade.

After the ceremony and congratulations the guests were seated at a wedding dinner, which was one of the finest ever served in this vicinity, and afterwards dancing was the order until time for Mr. and Mrs. Green to take the train for their wedding tour, and the entire party went to the train with them, loading them down with rice and best wishes.

The bride’s costume was ivory satin, brocaded, and diamond ornaments. She carried bridal roses. The bridesmaid, Miss Kittie Shaver, wore white silk organdies over blue silk, and the other maids were all attired in white silk and carried pink and La France roses.

The presents were numerous and very beautiful. The Joliet associates of the groom sent down a very handsome one, and the others were all in keeping with it.

Those present were:

Messrs. and Mesdames John Channel, M. Masters, Breese, Dayton; Frank Lansing, Wedron: V. Canfield, Dayton; Dr. and Mrs. Lovejoy, Marseilles; C. G. Werner, Ella Sage, C. J. Metzger and Merrifield, Ottawa; John Bogert, Dayton, and W. Van Etten, Batavia.

Misses Addie Werner, Breese, Grace and Barbara Green, Myrtle, Sadie and Hattie Olmstead, Nettie Furr, Lena Bruner, Florence Pickens, Jennie and Lizzie Bogert, Fannie Bryan, Mary Ward, Della Masters and Nora Barnes.

Mesdames Laura Parr, M. E. Furr, Wm. Ribbs, John Barnes, A. Ladd, O. W. Trumbo, E. Rose, and Pitts, of Marseilles.

Messrs. Basil, Fred, W. R., Lyle, Joseph and Ralph Green, Ed McCleary, Rob Rhoades, Gus Kneusel, Louis Oleson, C. A. Dawell, H. G. Warner, James Green and Ed Rose, of Ottawa, and Captains W. A. Luke and L. P. Hall, Lieut. S. M. Ahern and W. L. Phillips, G. A. Miller and T. F. O’Malley, of Joliet.


  1. Ottawa Republican-Times, August 19, 1897, p3

The Charles Hoag family

Helen Hoag tombstone          Charles H Hoag, tombstone                                                                               Helen                         Charles                               Mary
Charles Hoag and his two wives in the Dayton Cemetery

In the following sketch, the names in red are of those buried in the Dayton Cemetery

Charles H. Hoag was born May 18, 1821 in Delft, New York. He spent several years in Michigan, arriving there in 1845. In 1847, in St. Joseph county, Michigan, he married Helen M. Robinson , who was born in 1829 in New York. They came to La Salle county in 1849 and settled on a rented farm in Dayton township. They had five children:
1. infant (never named) – born abt 1848, died in infancy
2. infant (never named) – born abt 1849, died in infancy
3. Mary D., b 30 Jul 1850, d. 25 Jun 1901, m. to  Leonidas “Lee” Fread
4. Clara – b. 28 Jan 1854, d. 27 Aug 1919, m. 22 Mar 1871 to Albert Fread
5. William Walter – b. 28 Aug 1855, d. 12 Jun 1879, m. 18 Sep 1878 to Ida Brumley
Helen Robinson Hoag died September 13, 1856.

On 5 Nov 1857, Charles Hoag married Mary A. Wells, who was born in New York November 13, 1841. They had nine children:
6. Charles Lincoln, b. 25 Apr 1859, d. 30 Jul 1928, m. 20 Dec 1884 to Callie I. Brady
7. George R., b. abt 1862, d. 1894
8. Lillie M., b. 25 Dec 1863, d. 20 Mar 1940, m. 11 Jun 1891 to Walter Carter (divorced)
9. Cynthia, b. abt 1865, d. 1868
10. Cyrus W., b. 8 Apr 1867, d. 14 Oct 1889
11. Frank Logan, b. 14 Oct 1869, d. 14 Jul 1936
12. Alvin H., b. 19 Sep 1871, d. 13 Oct 1939
13. Adams W., b. Apr 1874, d. 4 Mar 1943, m. 1 Mar 1898 to Josephine Beckwith
14. Maud C., b. 22 May 1879, d. 29 Jan 1962, m. 22 Dec 1898 to Caplus B. Stockham
Mary Wells Hoag died October 26, 1891.

After four years of steady toil on the rented farm, Charles Hoag purchased a farm adjoining the town plat of Serena, where he spent the rest of his life. Being public-spirited he did his share toward the improvement of his home town. In politics he  was first a Whig and later entered the Republican ranks. He held many local offices of trust, including town and school offices.

Charles died September 2, 1904.

10 year old boy dies in fall

On July 24, 1886, ten year old Leendert Bogerd was herding cattle for Mr. Baker, just west of Dayton, allowing them to graze as they moved along. He climbed a tree and when a dead limb broke off, he fell upon the roots below, which struck him in the stomach. He was found by the members of a Sunday school class who were out on a picnic. He was seriously hurt and said that he wanted to see his mother for he was going to die. He died the next day and was buried in the Dayton Cemetery. He was described in the newspaper as the son of Mr. and Mrs. Austin Simpson, but Simpson was his stepfather, having married his widowed mother.

The boy’s parents, born in Zeeland, Netherlands, had immigrated to the United States in 1872. Pieter Boogerd married Stoffelina van den Houten March 23, 1872, in Ouwerkerk, Netherlands. They left for the United States that same year, coming to Dayton, where Pieter’s brother, Leendert, was already living . In Dayton they anglicized their names to Peter and Lena Bogerd.

Peter and Lena had three children: Cornelius, born in 1874; Leendert, born in 1876; and Peter, born in 1878. Peter, the father, died in 1878 and Lena and the three children were living in Dayton in 1880, next door to John and Jacoba Baker, another Dutch couple from Zeeland.

After Peter’s death Lena remarried, in 1881, to Austin Simpson, a coal miner and farmer from Dayton. When he retired they moved to Ottawa where Lena died in 1924.

Oliver Trumbo and his brothers

Trumbo brothers

In the 1850 census of Dayton township, there were 23 residents born in Virginia. In 1860 that number had grown to 44. A large part of the increase can be put down to the arrival of Jacob Trumbo and his family. Jacob and his wife, Elizabeth (Snyder) Trumbo, were natives of the Brock’s Gap area of Rockingham County, Virginia. Their children were educated in the common schools there and worked on the family farm. In 1853 Jacob and Elizabeth moved to the Dayton area, where his half-brother Mathias had settled in 1830. They brought seven of their eight living children with them. Only the oldest son, Benjamin, remained behind in Brock’s Gap where he lived out his life. Jacob bought a quarter section of farm land near Dayton and settled the family there. Unfortunately, he died within six months of their arrival, leaving his sons to work the land for their mother.

Oliver, the next oldest son after Benjamin, spent the next few years in farming. In 1854 he married Rebecca, daughter of John Green. In 1857 he joined with his father-in-law and two brothers-in-law in the firm of J. Green and Sons, which operated the woolen mill in Dayton.

Oliver was active in local community affairs, serving as constable, township collector, assessor and road commissioner. He was appointed postmaster of Dayton, serving  from 1857 to 1866. After the failure of the woolen mill in 1873, Oliver returned to farming. He and Rebecca had two daughters; Jessie, born in 1867, and Frankie Rae, born in 1876.. Jessie lived to adulthood, married, and had many descendants, while Frankie died of malarial fever at the age of 7. Oliver and Rebecca made their home in Dayton, until Oliver died in 1905. Rebecca continued to live in their home, but spent winters with her daughter Jessie, who lived in Mendota.

Moab bought land for himself in 1859 and also continued to work his mother’s land.. He lived there with his mother and two younger brothers, Matthias and Christopher, who also worked on the farm. In 1860, Moab’s land was worth $5000 and his mother’s, $17,000. In 1873, Moab bought the family farm from his mother, who had moved into a house in Dayton by that time.

Benjamin, the son who remained in Virginia, made regular trips to Illinois to visit and one of them provided the opportunity to have this picture taken. It must have been taken between 1859, when son John died, and 1869, when both Matthias and Christopher died of consumption. Matthias had been in ill health and went back to Virginia in the hopes it would improve, but it did not, and he died there. Less than a month later, Christopher also died, leaving Oliver and Moab the only remaining brothers in Illinois.

John Green’s Last Will and Testament

John Green

John Green

Last   Will & Testament of John Green deceased
Filed June 3rd 1874

Know all men by these presents that I, John Green of the Town of Dayton in the County of LaSalle and State of Illinois considering the uncertainty of life, and being of sound mind and memory, do make declare, and publish this my last will and testament, hereby revoking all former wills, I give bequeath and devise my real Estate and personal property, as follows that is to say,

First I desire that all my debts be paid of whatever name or nature, to be made out of my Personal property, first, and balance if any from my real estate hereinafter devised and bequeathed unto my three sons Jesse Green, David Green, Isaac Green and my daughter Rebecca Trumbo.

Second I desire that my beloved wife Barbara Green shall have three hundred dollars per annum during her natural life (if she requires it) to be paid equally by my three sons above named, who are required to pay for her use quarterly the sum of twenty five dollars each, and it is hereby expressly understood that the said Barbara Green is to have her bed and bedding, and to make her home with my son Isaac Green.

Third I give, bequeath and devise unto my son Jesse Green and to his heirs and assigns, the following real estate Viz:- the South half of the East half of the North West quarter of Section twenty nine (29) and the North half of the East half of the South West quarter of section twenty nine (29) and the East fraction of the West half of the North East quarter of section thirty two (32) containing Sixty five and Sixty five (65 65/100) one hundredths acres lying and being in the North part of the West half of the North East quarter of section sixteen (16) also village lots one (1) two (2) and three (3) in Block numbered nine (9) and lots No one (1) two(2) three (3) four (4) and five (5) in Block No Eight (8) all in the original Town plat of Dayton, all the above and foregoing lands and lots lying and being in Township No thirty four (34) North of Range four (4) East of the third Principal Meridian in LaSalle County and State of Illinois, to have and to hold the same together all the rights priveleges and appurtenances thereunto belonging.

Fourth I give, bequeath, and devise unto my son David Green and to his heirs and assigns that portion of the West part of the South East quarter of section twenty nine (29) Town 34 North of Range four (4) East of the third P.M. and bounded as follows Viz: on the North by lands heretofore deeded to Jesse Green and David Green, (and since by them to John F. Nash assignee of J. Green & Co) on the East by Fox River, on the South by the section line dividing Sections twenty nine (29) and thirty two (32) and on the West by the Feeder to the Illinois and Michigan Canal, containing Eight (8) acres be the same more or less together with my entire potion of the water Power Secured and reserved in a certain Deed or release given to the State of Illinois and bearing date June 5th 1838 and not heretofore disposed of, also subject to the restrictions and conditions of said Deed or release to the State aforesaid, also Vilage lots No one (1) two (2) and the North half of lot No Seven (7) and all of lot Eight (8) in Block three (3) and lots three (3) and four (4) in Block No one (1) in the original town Plat of the Vilage of Dayton LaSalle County Illinois: Also eighteen and Seventy-nine (18 79/100) hundredths acres of the North End of the South half of the East half of the South West quarter of section (29) Township thirty-four (34) North of Range four East of the third 3rd principal Meridian in the County of LaSalle and State of Illinois: To have and to hold the same together with all the rights, priveleges and appurtenances thereunto belonging or in any wise pertaining.

Fifth, I give bequeath and devise unto my son Isaac Green and to his heirs and assigns the North half of the East half of the North West quarter of section twenty nine (29) and all of that part of portion of the fractional North East quarter of section twenty nine (29) which lies West of Fox River, except that portion heretofore deeded to Jesse Green and David Green as shown by deed duly recorded in Book Eleven (11) Page four (4) of County Records; also all that portion or part of the West part of the South East fractional quarter of section twenty nine (29) lying West of Fox River and bounded as follows, on the North by the half section line of said section twenty nine (29) on the West by the half section line of said section (29) on the South by Washington Street as Shown by the original Town Plat of the Vilage of Dayton, on the East by the Feeder to the Illinois and Michigan Canal be the same more or less To have and to hold the same together with all the improvements and appurtenances thereunto belonging or in any wise pertaining, all of the above and foregoing lands lying and being in Township thirty four (34) North of Range four (4) East of the third principal Meridian in LaSalle County and State of Illinois.

Sixth: I give devise and bequeath unto my daughter Rebecca Trumbo and to her heirs and assigns Lots one (1) two (2) and three (3) in Block No fourteen (14) also fractional lots two (2) three (3) and four (4) in Block No eleven (11) all in the original Town Plat of the Vilage of Dayton, to have and to hold the same together with all the improvements rights, priveleges and appurtenances thereunto belonging.

Seventh, My other Daughters Eliza Dunavan, Nancy Dunavan, Katherine Dunavan and Rachael Gibson have all been provided for, previous to the making of this distribution of my estate.

Eighth should there be any portion of my personal property left after paying my indebtedness as hereinbefore mentioned, I desire that it be divided equally among my three sons Jesse Green, David Green, and Isaac Green.

Ninth I hereby appoint my sons Jesse Green and David Green Executors of this my last Will and testament, in witness whereof I have signed, sealed published and declared this instrument as my will at Dayton LaSalle County Illinois, this 19th day of January A. D. 1874

John Green {seal}

The said John Green of Dayton LaSalle County Illinois on this 19th day of January A. D. 1874 signed and sealed this instrument and published and declared the same as and for his last Will, and we at his request and in his presence, and in the presence of each other have hereunto written our names as subscribing witnesses.

Chas B. Hess
Geo. W. Green
Newton M. Green

The 225th anniversary of Barbara Green’s birth

Barbara Grove Green

Barbara Grove Green was born November 15, 1792, in Rockingham County, Virginia. She was my great-great grandmother and by the time she died, she was regarded as the grandmother of a large area of the county. Here’s what was said about her in the Free Trader on May 22, 1886:

From Dayton
Barbara Grove Green

            Died May 5th, 1886, at the age of ninety three years, five and a half months. She had been confined to bed for about two months, and gradually and gladly passed away like an infant going to sleep. It was her desire to cast off this earthly tabernacle and be present with her Lord.

She retained her faculties to the last, with the exception of her sight, of which she had been deprived for the past seven or eight years. She was never heard to murmur or complain of her misfortune, but on the contrary seemed cheerful and happy.

She was born in Shenandoah county, Virginia, November 15th, 1792. At the age of thirteen she, with her parents, removed to Licking county, Ohio, being in the year 1805, and lived there until the fall of 1829, when she and her companion, John Green and family, removed to this county. A few incidents of their journey will show the hardships and privations of those early pioneer days. We quote her own words from statements made by her to one of her grand daughters, who has recorded them:

“We started from Licking county, Ohio, on the first of November, 1829, for the state of Illinois. There were 24 in the company. Father had gone to Illinois the September before we started and bought land. He and three other men rode on horseback around by Cleveland and along the lakes. When they reached Chicago, where there were only two families besides the garrison, father bought some provisions and in paying for them pulled out quite a roll of bills. That night his brother, Wm. Green, dreamed there were robbers coming and woke the others up, but they refused to start out in the night just for a dream, and he went to sleep again only to dream the same thing again, and when he had dreamed it three times he told them they could stay there if they wanted to, he was going to leave; so they all started and soon after they saw three men following for the purpose of stealing they [sic] money.

“When we reached the ‘Wilderness,’ in Indiana, a man who lived on the edge of the woods told us it was impossible to go on, as the mud was so deep, unless we could travel on the wagons already stuck in the mud; but if we were foolish enough to try it, we must leave ‘those two smart little boys’ (Jesse and David), for we would surely freeze to death. But we did go on and the men cut a new road through the woods for sixty miles, about ten miles a day.

“The, when we got to Cicero river, we had to take the wagons over with bed cords. One wagon, loaded with mill irons and blacksmith tools, was so heavy it tipped over, and we lost a good many things.

“Then the next place we came to was Sugar creek, and it was so high we had to pull the wagons over with ropes again and cut trees for us to walk on. Then there was a swamp next to the creek that the men had to carry the women over on their backs. Between Iroquois and Nettle creek there were five days the horses had nothing to eat, as the prairie was burnt, and they became so weak they got stuck in a ravine and could hardly pull the empty carriage out.

“One evening we had only bread and tea for supper, but that night father came back with corn and beef that he had obtained at Holderman’s Grove, and we were the happiest people you ever saw. We spent the next night at the Grove and the next day home, at what is known as William Dunavan’s farm.”

She lived in the town of Rutland something over a year when she removed to Dayton, being at this place at the time of the Black Hawk war in 1832. Of this war she says: “On the 16th of May, 1832, the girls and I were at the spring, near where the feeder bridge now stands, when Eliza came down on horseback and told us that the Indians were coming, and we would have to go to Ottawa immediately. Then we went to a place a couple of miles below Ottawa and stayed there all night, and the third day returned home again. This was Sunday, and the next day the men made a stockade around the house out of plank. After it was finished they tried it to see if a bullet would go through it, and as it did, they hung feather beds all around. There were about sixty people here at the time, and we were so crowded that they had to sleep on tables, under the beds and all over the house.”

Mr. Green had intended to remain in his improvised fort during the war, but at about twelve o’clock at night, hearing of the massacre on Indian creek, and fearing there might be too many Indians, all those in the fort went to Ottawa. “When we got to Ottawa, there was no fort there, only a log cabin on the south side of the river, but they soon built a fort on top of the hill. We went to the fort, but there was so much confusion there that we had the log house moved up on the hill and lived in it. The next day a company of soldiers from the southern part of the state passed through Ottawa on the way up the river.”

Grandma Green bore all the hardships and privations incident to the settlement of two new countries and lived to see the development of this vast prairie country far, very far beyond her anticipations. When she came here she supposed that in time she might see the country settled around the skirts of timber, but never in her early days did she anticipate seeing the prairies settled up.

110 Years ago today this appeared in the Ottawa Free Trader newspaper

OLD PIONEER GONE
Resided in County for Seventy-Eight Years
JESSE GREEN GONE TO HIS REWARD
The End Came Peacefully at Ryburn Hospital Saturday Night – Had Been For Years Actively Identified With Life of County

Jesse Green died at six o’clock Saturday night at Ryburn hospital. To the younger generation, and to the newcomers among us, that may not mean much. But to the old residents of the county, it will come as the notice of the close of a long eventful and useful life. As man and boy he had lived in La Salle county for almost eighty years. The notice of his death will be read with regret by a wide circle of friends.

Jesse Green was born in Newark, Ohio, in 1817. With his father, John Green, he came to Dayton in 1829. Father and son were long identified with the growth of the county in many ways. The elder Green built the first mill at Dayton, the first flour being ground there on July 4th, 1830. A sawmill was also run in connection and it furnished the lumber to build the first frame house in Ottawa in 1831.

In 1840 they built the first woolen mill with power looms in the state. This ran very successfully until the close of the war. In the early 70’s they met with a series of reverses, but Jesse Green bought in the property and ran it until 1882, when it was sold to Williams and Hess. They organized a stock company for the manufacture of pressed brick.

In 1849 Jesse Green was one of an adventurous party of about fifty others who made the overland trip to California. After remaining in the west two years he returned to La Salle county to make it his home until his death.

He was married June 22, 1843, to Isabella Trumbo, daughter of Mathias and Rebecca Trumbo. His first wife died December 1, 1854, leaving five children – John B., Rollin T., Newton M., Clara J., and an infant who died soon after her mother. Mr. Green subsequently married Hannah Rhoades, a native of Brownsville, Pa. From this second marriage, nine children were born – Thomas H., Joseph, James A., Cora R., Sarah (deceased), Frank, Jesse A. (deceased), John K. and Mabel (deceased). In politics Mr. Green was a Democrat. He was a Universalist in religious faith. He has served three years and supervisor, two terms as justice of the peace, and about six years as postmaster at Dayton.

The children now surviving are Newton M., of Serena; Mrs. C. B. Hess, of this city; Thomas H., Frank, and J. Kent, of Chicago; Joseph, of Coffeyville, Kansas; James A., of Grand Junction, Col.

The funeral will be held from the C. B. Hess residence Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock. Interment in the Dayton cemetery.1


  1. The Ottawa [Illinois] Free Trader, 11 October 1907, p 5, col 3

Albert Charlier

S S Kroonland

When Albert Charlier died in Ottawa on June 5th, 1945, his obituary, reporting his burial in the Dayton cemetery, said only that “the deceased, of whom little is known, lived in a cottage near Dayton.” He has no tombstone in the cemetery. He never married. Nonetheless, it is possible to reconstruct the outline of his life and make his history known at last.

Albert was born in Fréconrupt, La Broque, Alsace, on September 26, 1879, the son of Jean Baptiste and Marie Claire (Charlier) Charlier. The Catholic Charlier family had lived in Fréconrupt for hundreds of years.

When Albert was about 15, an older friend, Josef Beller, decided to go to America. He must have written home with good news about his prospects, because at age 25 Albert also decided to emigrate.

He left Antwerp on March 18, 1905, on the S S Kroonland [photo above] where he traveled in steerage. He arrived in New York City on March 28. He was 25 years, six months old, single, a laborer, and able to read and write. He paid his own passage and had $44 with him. He had been living in Rothau, in Alsace, which had recently changed from being part of France to belonging to Germany, so he was listed on the manifest as German, although actually Albert was French. He said his final destination was Dayton, Ill, where he was going to join his friend Josef Beller.

Apparently he found work in Dayton, as in 1908 he was able to buy lots 6 and 7 in block 13 of the original town of Dayton from Elizabeth Benoit for $175.

In 1910 he was living in Dayton working at odd jobs. He owned his house and had filed his first papers for naturalization.

In 1918, when he registered for the draft, he was a mine worker for the Dayton Clay works. He was of medium height and weight, with brown hair and eyes.

In 1920, he was living in his own home in Dayton and working as a railroad section laborer. He had not yet become a citizen.

In 1921 he sold his house and lots in Dayton to John Garcia for $450. He went back to France, probably to see how his family had fared during the war.

In 1923 he returned from Europe on the S S La Lorraine, sailing from Le Havre on April 16. His nearest relative in France was his father, Mr. Charlier in Schirmeck, Alsace. He was bound for Dayton, Illinois. He was going to join a friend, Mrs. Klari Hess Green in Dayton, Illinois. This is most likely Clara Green Hess, daughter of Jesse Green and wife of C. B. Hess.

On January 14, 1938 he went to the circuit court in Ottawa and became a naturalized citizen.

In April 1940 he had been out of work for 6 months . He had worked for 6 weeks in 1939 at the power plant in Dayton for a total of $100.

By 1942, when he registered for the WWII draft, he was again employed at the Dayton power plant. He listed Lindo Corso of Dayton as someone who would always know his address.

He died of stomach cancer June 5th, 1945, in the hospital in Ottawa, and was buried in the Dayton cemetery on June 7th.

Unknown at his death, he is unknown no longer.

Another Dayton Schoolteacher

Naomi Trent

Naomi Trent
March 2, 1902 – January 15, 1974

 Mrs. Trent was born March 2, 1902, in Norcatur, Kansas, to Charles and Mary Patanoe Pool. On Jan. 21, 1921, she married James Trent, who preceded her in death in 1963.

She was a retired school teacher and former principal of the Dayton School. She also taught at Central School. She was a member of the Ottawa and Dayton Women’s Club, the Retired Teacher’s Association, and World War I Woman’s Auxiliary.

Survivors include two daughters, Mrs. George (Dorothy) Haas of Morris and Mrs. George (Maxine) Heide of Lagos, Nig.; one son, James of Melrose Park; a brother, Clifford Pool of Clearlake Highland, Calif.; nine grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her parents and her husband.1

Mrs. Trent and Santa

Mrs. Trent ruled over the upstairs room of the Dayton school, which held grades five through eight. In addition to her teaching duties, she was involved in many school activities, not the least of which was presiding at the annual Christmas pageant at the clubhouse.

When I was in Mrs. Trent’s room, there were around twenty students in the four grades. After listening to the other classes recite their lessons, by the time we reached eighth grade, we had heard them all several times over. Luckily Mrs. Trent realized this and the eighth graders, once their lessons were prepared, could work on a large jigsaw puzzle spread out on a table at the back of the room. We never did manage to complete it, as I recall.


  1. From her obituary in The Daily Times [Ottawa, Illinois] Jan 16, 1974, p. 10

Hezekiah Bacon – Weaver

         Bacon, Hezekiah Hezekiah and Sarah (Davey) Bacon

The Dayton woolen mill had a number of employees from England. Some worked there for many years; others for only a few. One such was Hezekiah Bacon, who was only in Dayton for a few years. He appears in the 1870 census of Dayton, living with the William Lancaster family. No other record has been found of him in La Salle county. However, a good bit is known of his life both before and after his stop in Dayton.

Hezekiah was born in 1833 in Halstead, a silkweaving town in Essex, England. His father and mother, older brother, and younger sisters were all silkweavers, as was Hezekiah. The town was dominated by the silkweaving trade and when, in 1860, the tariff on imported silks was removed, competition from the French caused the trade to collapse in England.

Hezekiah had married Sarah Ann Davey in 1852 and they had four children, so the poor opportunities for him in England decided him to emigrate to America. He came by himself, to test the possibilities before bringing the rest of his family. He arrived in New York City in December of 1867. How he came to Dayton is unknown, but one plausible explanation is that he went from New York to the mill town of Lowell, Massachusetts, and found work in the mills there. Hezekiah may very well have met William Lancaster, who was also working there, and come with him when he headed west. Both William and Hezekiah were working in the Dayton woolen mill in 1870.

In 1872 he sent for his wife. Sarah Ann arrived in New York in October of 1872, accompanied by their youngest child, Emily, aged 4. Two older children, Sarah Ann and Hezekiah Charles, immigrated later, while one daughter remained in England.

In 1873 the Dayton factory went out of business and Hezekiah had to find another workplace. J. Capps & Sons’ woolen mill was a major manufacturer in Jacksonville, Illinois, and both Hezekiah and William Lancaster were soon working there.

Hezekiah died September 17, 1887, in Jacksonville and was buried in Diamond Grove Cemetery. After his death, Sarah Ann lived for a time with her daughter Emily Nichols. Sarah died in 1915 and is also buried in Diamond Grove Cemetery.

Additional information about Hezekiah Bacon may be found here.

Thomas Henry “Harry” Green

 

                            Cora Childs                                  Harry Green                                Harry  and Cora

Thomas Henry “Harry” Green was born January 9, 1857 in Dayton, the oldest son of Jesse Green and his second wife, Hannah Rhodes. Harry went to grade school in Dayton. He then attended Jennings Seminary in Aurora, one of the finest private high schools in the middle west. Jesse Green, Harry’s father, was himself largely self-educated, as he had only a few terms of formal schooling. He clearly recognized the value of education for his children and sent them to Jennings.

Like his younger brothers, Harry began by working for their father in the woolen mill, but on the first of February, 1880, at the age of 23, Harry took over the store in Dayton, where he sold dry goods, groceries, boots and shoes, notions, medicines and almost anything else you could think of. A notice in the Ottawa paper announcing the change in management said that he was doing a cash business. In earlier times on the frontier, a storekeeper would offer credit to the farmers, or would take farm products in trade for goods, but by the 1880s, cash was more readily available, so Harry could operate on that basis. He traveled to Chicago and St. Louis periodically on buying trips, where he would replenish his supplies and see what was new and interesting.

The Dayton store would have been one of the centers of village life. In addition to the many items for sale, there were other attractions. In February of 1881, the Dayton Library Association was founded, with Isaac Green as President, Charles Green as Secretary and Harry Green as Librarian. Harry was the librarian because the library, all one hundred volumes of it, was housed at the store. You paid fifty cents a year to join and then you could borrow any book. The store was also a central point for spreading the news, so much so that the correspondent to the Ottawa newspaper requested that news items for the column be left at the store.

Some time in the mid-1880s a young lady named Cora Childs came to teach in the Dayton school. She had been born in 1860 in Marshall County. In 1864, her parents moved to Ottawa to take advantage of the better educational opportunities for their daughters. She graduated from Ottawa Township High School in 1879 and then completed the two year program at Wesleyan college in Cincinnati in one year, graduating in June 1880. She taught at several other La Salle County schools before coming to Dayton. When her parents moved to Morris she taught in the Junior High School there, but Harry had obviously made an impression on her and they were married on February 22, 1888.

After their marriage, they lived near Morris, where Harry ran a bakery and restaurant. He was also a jobber, or wholesaler, in fruits, confectionery, oysters, tobacco and cigars. An ad for Green’s Bakery and European Restaurant in the Morris Herald touted their wedding cakes, which could be furnished on short notice, and described the business as a place “Where you can get anything you want, from a cup of coffee and sandwich up to a big square meal.” Unfortunately, this establishment burned and they then returned to Ottawa. Harry went to work for the Standard Brick Company, where his brother-in-law, C. B. Hess, was a partner.

In 1892 Harry and Cora moved to Chicago where he later worked as an electrical engineer. Cora was very active in various patriotic organizations. She held a number of offices with the DAR, including many years as regent. She was the first regent of the Chicago chapter of the DAC, the Daughters of the American Colonists; was a member of the Daughters of 1812 and many other similar organizations. She and Harry, who was now T. Henry,  were listed in the 1913 Chicago Blue Book of prominent residents. At that time they lived at 55 W. North Avenue and had a summer residence in Morris. Cora was active in the social life of Chicago, announcing her daughter Mabel’s engagement at a reception and musical at the Plaza hotel.

Somewhere around 1910, Harry’s last name acquired an extra “e”, Greene. Cora, who was very interested in family history, had learned much of the Green history from Harry’s cousin, Maud, who was the Green family historian. Maud had attempted to trace the Green family’s origin, and had identified John Greene the Surgeon, of Rhode Island as a possible progenitor. Cora evidently convinced Harry that the extra “e” should be added. In Harry’s obituary, which Cora surely wrote, the “e” was even added retroactively to his father, Jesse, and his grandfather, John, neither of whom ever spelled their name that way. Incidentally, it is almost certain that John Greene the Surgeon was NOT an ancestor of the Dayton Green family.

Harry died September 24, 1939 in Chicago. The funeral was held in Chicago and the body was taken by train to Ottawa, where he was buried in the family plot in the Ottawa Avenue cemetery on Sep. 27th.

The marriage of Jesse Green and Isabella Trumbo

Jesse Green & Isabella Trumbo marriage license            

On June 22, 1843, Jesse Green, son of John and Barbara (Grove) Green, married his cousin Isabella Trumbo, daughter of Matthias and Rebecca (Grove) Trumbo. They lived in Dayton in this house, which was built in 1853, on blocks 7 and 8 of the plat of Dayton.

Isabella died in childbirth on December 1, 1854, and the baby died shortly thereafter.

They had 5 children, two of whom lived to adulthood:

Rollin T., born January 31, 1847; died September 21, 1864 in Dayton.

John Byron, born in July 1847; died 6 May 1849, while his father was away in California digging for gold.

Clara Isabel, “Callie”, born December 21, 1849, also while her father was in California. She married Charles Benton Hess on April 12, 1869 in Dayton. They later moved to Ottawa, where she died on July 25, 1930.

Newton M., born May 7, 1852. He married Ella Pool on December 24, 1874. She was the daughter of Joseph and Mary Ann (Anderson) Pool. Newton Green died on February 29, 1920.

William D., born in November 1864; died January 14, 1855.

Jesse remarried about a year after Isabella’s death and had a second family with Hannah Rebecca Rhodes.

The widow is entitled to the following . . .

Appraisal of property for widow

Christian Stickley died in Dayton on April 19, 1854, and is buried in the Dayton cemetery. His widow was entitled by law to certain items from the estate for the support of herself and her children. The inventory (shown above) lists the following items:

Necessary beds, bedsteads and bedding for the family of the deceased
Necessary household and kitchen furniture
One spinning wheel
One loom and its appendages
One pair of cards [for carding the wool before spinning]
One stove and the necessary pipe therefore
The wearing apparel of the family
milk cow with calf, one for every four persons in the family
One horse, at the value of forty dollars
One woman’s saddle and bridle, of the value of fifteen dollars
Provisions for the family for one year
sheep, two for each member of the family
Fleeces taken from the same
Food for the stock above described for six months
Fuel for the family for three months
Sixty dollars worth of other property

Left with small children, the widow, Esther (Morgan) Stickley remarried, to Aaron Daniels, on February 22, 1855, and he became the guardian for her children. Watch for a future post on the guardianship releases for sons Edward and Henry Stickley.

On Memorial Day We Honor Another Veteran

US flag

On this Memorial Day weekend, the veterans buried in the Dayton Cemetery take the spotlight. One of them is John W. Channel. He was born March 10, 1849 in Licking County, Ohio and came to Illinois with his parents in 1851.

In April, 1865, at the age of 16, he lied about his age to enroll in Company E, 3rd Illinois Cavalry. In May, the Regiment went to Minnesota where he participated in an Indian expedition through Minnesota and Dakota Territory. They arrived back at Fort Snelling in October, where he was discharged.

He returned to Dayton where he married Josephine Makinson on June 27, 1868. They had two children who lived to adulthood, Eva M., born in Dayton July 31, 1869, and Clyde W., born July 5, 1887.

In 1870, he was working in the Green Woolen Mill as a cloth finisher. In 1881 he moved to St. Louis where he was engaged in the manufacturing of horse collars, with J. W. Denning & Co. He sold his interest to his partner on account of poor health, and returned to Dayton  to assume the management of the Basil Green tile works. When the firm of Hess, Crotty and Williams was organized, Mr. Channel became the superintendent of the works. He remained in this position until the Standard Fire Brick Co. was organized, when he left the employ of Hess, Crotty and Williams, to become president and general manager of the new company. In 1898 he disposed of his interest in the Standard Fire Brick Co. and purchased the tile factory of Basil Green of Dayton, in company with his son-in-law, Arthur T. Ladd, operating under the firm name of J. W. Channel & Co. He died November 22, 1900 and is buried in the cemetery, as is his wife.

John W and Josephine Channel, tombtone

English Workers at the Dayton Woolen Mill

power looms

Many of the employees at the Dayton Woolen factory were from England, bringing their previous experience of factory work to the Dayton mill. One of these, William Lancaster, was working in Dayton as a wool sorter in 1870.

William was born in Addingham, Yorkshire on May 31, 1835, the son of Thomas and Ann (Wildman) Lancaster. Thomas and all his family were deeply involved in the wool trade.  Thomas worked in the West Yorkshire mills as a wool top finisher;  at least five of his sons and three of his daughters also worked in the factory. The children would start by the age of ten, on the spinning machines. As they got older, they moved on to more responsible jobs – wool combing overseer, power loom weaver, or wool top finisher. William, at the age of fifteen, was a power loom weaver of worsted cloth.

In 1859 William married Elizabeth Muff, the daughter of William and Patience (Elsworth) Muff. They had a daughter, Frances Elsworth Ann, born the following year, and in 1862, a son, Seth Elsworth. For whatever reason, William seems to have left the wool trade and moved to Pudsey, Yorkshire, where he was a milk dealer in 1861. Whether this was because of a slowdown in the wool trade or merely a desire for a change, in 1866 William left Yorkshire altogether and with his wife and son (Frances having died in 1865) took ship for America on the City of New York leaving from Liverpool and arriving in New York on July 30, 1866.

Apparently wool was in William’s blood though, as he found recruiters were encouraging workers to go to Lowell, Massachusetts, to work in the mills there. He found work there as a wool sorter, and while living in Lowell, a daughter, Martha Ellen was born. More research will be needed to explain how he heard of Dayton and why he decided to go there, but by 1870 he was at work in Dayton as a wool sorter. He inspected all incoming wool and was skilled in sorting it into lots by color and quality, as length and fineness of fiber. A successful wool sorter would have had a perception of color shades greater than that of an artist.

By 1880, William had moved his family to Jacksonville, Illinois, where he and his son, Seth, were working in the Jacksonville Woolen Mills. Apparently unable to settle in one place, by 1900 he was working and living in Chester, Pennsylvania, another mill town not far from Philadelphia. Here his wife, Elizabeth died in 1893, and a few years later he remarried, to Margaretta, widow of John Blithe. In 1910, at the age of 74, he was still working as a wool sorter. He died on March 9, 1917, bringing to a close a life dedicated to the wool trade.