Jacob Trumbo’s Will

last will and testament

from La Salle County, Illinois, will book A., pp. 147-148

I Jacob Trumbo of Dayton in the county of LaSalle and State of Illinois being of sound and disposing mind memory and understanding, do make publish and declare this to be my last will and testament hereby revoking and making void all former wills and writings in the nature of last wills and testaments by me heretofore made.

My will is, first – that my funeral charges and debts shall be paid by my executor hereinafter named.

The residue of my estate and property which shall not be required for the payment of my just debts, funeral charges and that expense attending the execution of this my will and the administration of my estate I give devise and dispose of as follows

I give and bequeath to my grand-son Charles Riddle of Rockingham County Virginia twelve dollars per year from my decease, until he shall become twenty one years of age, or if he shall not live to the age of twenty one years, during his life; and if he lives to the age of twenty one years, I then will him two hundred to be paid to his guardian during his minority, or to him when he shall arrive at the age of twenty one years, by my executor hereinafter mentioned.

All the rest of my property both personal and real, I give to my beloved wife Elisabeth Trumbo by her to be disposed of according to her wishes.  And I do nominate and appoint my son Oliver Trumbo to be the sole executor of this my last will and testament.

In testimony whereof, I the said Jacob Trumbo have hereunto subscribed my name and affixed my seal this seventh day of November AD Eighteen hundres and fifty three.

Jacob Trumbo        (seal)

Signed Sealed and declared by the said Jacob Trumbo to be his last will and testament in presence of us, who, at his request and in his presence have subscribed our manes as witnesses hereto in the presence of each other.
Abram P. Hosford
Edward Bagley
Samuel Connick


I do solemnly swear that this writing contains the true last will and testament of the above named Jacob Trumbo deceased so far as I know or believe, and that I will well and truly execute the same by paying first the debts and then the legacies therein mentioned,  and that I will make a true and perfect inventory of all such goods and chattels, rights and credit as may come to my hands or knowledge belonging to the Estate of the said deceased and render a fair and just account of my executorship when thereunto required by Law
So help me God!                                                            Oliver Trumbo

Subscribed & sworn to in open Court
this 31st [sic] day of November 1853

W. Raymond Clerk

County Court, La Salle County November Term 1853
State of Illinois
La Salle County

Be it remembered that on this 30th day of November 1853 At the November Term of the County Court of said County the annexed Last will and Testament of Jacob Trumbo late of said County deceased was presented for probate and to be recorded by Oliver Trumbo who is therein named as sole executor thereof.

Whereupon the testimony of Abram P. Hosford, Edward Bagley, Samuel Connick taken before said Court on this 30th day of November 1853 the three subscribing witnesses to said will was produced and the said Witnesses separately testified that they were acquainted with Jacob Trumbo late of the said County the Testator in the attached his last will & Testament when in Court produced, and who is now deceased, that they were present and saw the said Jacob Trumbo the said Testator sign his name to the said will in their presence and in the presence of the said Testator and in the presence of each other, and that they believe the said testator at the time he signed tho said will was of sound mind and memory and not under any restraint to their knowledge or belief and the said Executor on this 30th day of November 1853 appeared and took and subscribed the oath required by the statute which is ? said will annexed

Whereupon the said last will and testament having been proved to the satisfaction of the Court, It is ordered and decreed that the same be admitted to probate and be recorded.

In testimony whereof the subscriber Clerk of the County Court of said County has hereunto set his hand and affixed the seal of said Court at Ottawa this 30th day of November 1853.

W. Raymond Clerk

 

Cora Dunavan Watts – Artist

Cora Dunavan Watts was born June 20, 1879, in Baker, La Salle County, Illinois. She died May 22, 1964, in Ottawa and is buried in the Precinct Cemetery in Earlville. She was a member of the large Green clan, a great-grandaughter of John Green, through his daughter Nancy, who married Joseph Albert Dunavan.

When she was a young girl she took an art course at the Art Institute in Chicago and later a correspondence course. Then she married and went to reside on a farm near Leland. Her duties as a wife and mother filled her time, but her love of art remained.

She renewed her hobby when, at the age of 78, she became a resident of the Cora J. Pope Home in Ottawa. She began her new career by taking a three-year correspondence course. She believed her early art training helped her to complete the course in only one and a half years.

She did some portrait work, as well as still life and scenes, and exhibited at the Allen Park Art Show and the Town and Country Art Show in Ottawa. She frequently worked from photographs as well as from life. Many of her relatives have pictures she painted from a favorite photograph.

Linderhof Castle

Linderhof Palace, painted by Cora Watts for Candace Wilmot

 

CONCUSSION OF THE BRAIN

Charles Benton Hess

Charles Benton Hess

Jesse Green’s son-in-law, C. B. Hess, was an owner of the Hess, Williams & Hess company, makers of firebrick and drain tile. The business was housed in the old stone mill in Dayton. Despite the injury described here, C. B. lived another twenty-seven years, not dying until the age of seventy-nine.

C. B. Hess Sustains Some Serious Injuries At Dayton

Mr. C. B. Hess met with a very serious accident at his works in Dayton Tuesday afternoon. The bricks that are made on the top floor of the building are lowered to the drying room through a chute. Mr. Hess was standing close to the chute, talking to one of the workmen, and a brick fell from the chute and struck him on top of the head. The brick weighed seven pounds and fell a distance of twelve feet and fell with such force that it produced concussion of the brain. Mr. Hess was brought to his home in this city [Ottawa] in an unconscious condition, and Dr. Dyer was summoned.

He examined Mr. Hess’s injuries and found that he was not only suffering from concussion of the brain in serious form, but also neuralgia, which was greatly aggravated by the concussion of the brain. He was very restless and suffered intense pain last night, but today he rested very comfortably and is considered out of danger by his physician.1


  1. The Ottawa [Illinois} Free Trader, 13 Jun 1891, p 5, col 1

The Guardianship of Edward and Henry Stickley

guardianship request of Esther Stickley Daniels

guardianship request of Esther Stickley Daniels

In June of 1854, Christian Stickley died in Dayton, leaving a widow, Esther, and two sons, Edward, age 7, and Henry, age 3. Esther married again on February 22, 1855, to Aaron Daniels.

Christian Stickley was the heir at law of Samual Stickley of Ohio. In the spring  of 1855, the Samual Stickley estate was ready to distribute the assets. Since Christian was dead, his sons were the heirs. However, the heirs were minors and needed a guardian to act for them. In the May term of the La Salle county court, Esther Daniels appeared and requested that Aaron Daniels, her husband, be named the guardian of her Stickley sons. On May 25, 1853, Aaron Daniels was sworn as guardian to the boys. He (with the assistance of Washington Bushnell) had to swear a guardianship bond of $800; said bond being null and void if he faithfully discharged the office of guardian and submitted yearly reports to the court.

From 1855 to 1862, Aaron fulfilled his duties, including paying the taxes on the Dayton lots the boys had inherited from their father. In 1863, Aaron wanted to move West with his wife and their young children. Edward and Henry apparently wished to stay in Illinois where they owned property, but they were still minors. Since Edward was now 14 years old, he was old enough to choose his own guardian. His choice,  Elias Trumbo, was then sworn as guardian and took out the guardianship bond, with the same caveats as before. Aaron Daniels filed a final report of his stewardship and moved to Kansas.

In 1870, Edward reached the age of twenty-one and Elias Trumbo turned over the assets he had been administering for him. Elias was released by the court from acting as Edward’s guardian. In September 1873, Elias was back to be released as guardian for Henry, who had also reached his majority.

H. B. Furr – Dayton inventor

H B Furr invention

Henry Furr introduced his patent application with the following words:

To all whom it may concern;
Be it known that I, Henry Bruce Furr, a citizen of Dayton, in the county of Lasalle and State of Illinois, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Rolling-Disk Cultivators; and I do declare the following to be a full, clear and exact description of the invention, such as will enable others skilled in the art to which it appertains to make and use the same.

This Dayton farmer was born in 1860, the oldest son of Squire Newton Furr, a pioneer who came to La Salle county in 1838,  and his wife Mary E. Bruner. There were seven children in the family, Henry B., Alice V., George L., Charles N., Ellery, Minnie B., and Nettie M. Consequently, Henry Bruce had many connection to Dayton. His sister, Alice Virginia, married Edward Joseph Ward, Minnie Furr married Charles Brown, and Nettie Mae Furr married Gilbert Masters, all local people.

Henry’s father died in October, 1875, and his widow, Mary, continued to farm, aided by her sons and sons-in-law. After her death in 1908, Henry and Ellery worked the farm together. Henry died in 1930, never having married, and it does not appear that he became rich due to his improvements to the rolling-disk cultivator.

Jacoba Verloo Baker

Zeeland,_Oosterland

Jacoba Verloo was born July 7, 1829 in Oosterland, Zeeland, Netherlands, the daughter of Cornelis Verloo and Pieternella de Vos. At the age of 22 she married Jan Bakker on October 10, 1851 in Oosterland. He was the son of Roeland Bakker and Janna van Sluijs. They had one known child, Roeland Jan Bakker, born December 30, 1851 in Oosterland, who died February 1, 1862 in Ouwerkerk, Zeeland.

Jan and Jacoba emigrated to the United States sometime after their son’s death and ended up in Dayton by 1870. In 1880 they were living next door to Lena Bogerd, another emigrant from Zeeland. They had anglicized their names to John and Jacoba Baker. John was a farmer, though it does not appear that he ever owned any land.

John died August 2, 1887 and was buried in the Dayton Cemetery.  Jacoba apparently moved to Grand Rapids, Michigan, where in December of 1888 she made a will, leaving everything to Jennie Lewis, described as her adopted daughter. She is listed in the Grand Rapids city directory in 1889 as living with Miss Jennie Baker. Jacoba came back to Ottawa, where she purchased the house at  537 E. Joliet St. in March of 1890. The Ottawa city directory lists Jacoba Baker and Jennie Baker as residing at 537 Joliet street. Jacoba died May 12, 1893 and is buried next to her husband in Dayton. Jennie Lewis filed for probate of Jacoba’s will in June 1893 and inherited the Joliet street house, which she rented to John Smith. No Jennie Baker or Jennie Lewis appears in the Ottawa city directories after that.

Are Jennie Lewis and Jennie Baker the same person? It would appear so, but further research is needed to identify Jennie Lewis of Grand Rapids.

Rebecca Green tells of the death of little Byron

picture of John B. Green tombstone

On July 9, 1849, David Green wrote a letter to his father, John, and his brothers Jesse and Joseph who were on their way to California in search of gold. David remained in Dayton to handle the businesses and the farm and his portion of the letter deals mostly with these matters. His sister Rebecca added to the letter and, among other family and local news, she told of the death of Jesse’s son, John Byron Green.

The death of Byron has been written to you before but for fear that you will not receive it I will speak of it here. He died the 6th of May.  He did not appear much worse till a few days before he died and was perfectly sensible till the last.  He looked at his father’s miniature a few minutes before he died.  His mother said to me it was the last he would see of his pa. He said no, pa will come back and handed the miniature to me and told me to put it away and in a little while sunk to rest as if going into a sweet slumber. We feel his loss [very] much as he was a great deal of company for us . . . but he has left us and we must submit to it as cheerfully as possible as this was a life of suffering for him.1


  1. David Green (Dayton, Illinois) to “Dear father and brothers” [John, Jesse, and Joseph Green], letter, 9 July 1849, privately held by Candace Wilmot, Urbana, Illinois.

Prosper Hisler

hisler, prosper

In January, 1921, Prosper Hisler, a resident of Dayton, applied for a passport, saying that he wanted to go back to France to see his brother and sisters in Wildersbach. Prosper was born there in 1864 and at the age of 25 he and a number of young men from his neighborhood came to the United States. They landed in New York in February 1889 and many of them came on to the area around Somonauk and Serena, Illinois, where there was a French settlement.

Prosper became a naturalized citizen in 1896 and lived in Dayton, where he found work in the brick yard. He was industrious and in 1902 was able to purchase a house and lot in the village. By 1910 he was a laborer on the C B & Q railroad.

Did he keep in touch with his family back in France? It was perhaps in order to see how they fared after the war that he went back to France in 1921. In order to afford the trip, he sold his house in Dayton and planned to sail from New York on January 15. Although he said on his passport application that he would return within the year, there is no indication that he ever came back to the United States.

This may be explained by an entry in the margin of his birth record in Wildersbach. He was born July 22, 1864, and alongside the birth record a marginal notation tells of his marriage in Wildersbach, November 5, 1921. At the age of 57, he was married to the widow Damoiseaux, nee Marie Elise Hisler.

A Joint Birthday Celebration

 

Taken September 6, 1910, at the residence of Basil Green, Dayton, Illinois, celebrating the eightieth birthday of Basil Green (born Sep 17) and Rebecca Green Trumbo (born Sep 8).

Front row: Alice Masters, Mildred Masters, John Gilman, Margaret Allison Barnes, Gladys Green

2nd row: Harry Hess, Nettie Masters & Pearl, Callie Hess, Kate Brown, ?, Basil Green, Rev. Jesse Green, C. B. Hess, Charles Olmstead, Rebecca Trumbo

3rd row: Jane (Jennie) Barnes, Edward Dallam, Harriet Olmstead Poole, Maud Green, Dora Trumbo, Del Terry Hess, Sadie Olmstead Green, Carrie Barnes Green, Rush Green, Ora Del Green, Aunt Barbara Jackson, Miss Etta Barnes, Mr. Ed McClary

4th row: Mrs. Emma Barnes McClary, Annie Robinson, Mrs. Winnie Dallam, Fred Green, Mrs. Josie Gibson, Mrs. Ralph Green, Win Green Sr, Mrs. Isaac Green, Mrs. Charles Olmstead

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Dunavan

CELEBRATED THEIR GOLDEN WEDDING1
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Dunavan Entertain One Hundred Friends at Dinner at Clifton.

            Fifty years ago today Miss A. Miranda Munson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Munson, of Freedom township, became the bride of Samuel Dunavan, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Albert Dunavan, living seven miles northeast of Ottawa, and today, after spending half a century together, they celebrated the event by entertaining one hundred of their friends and relatives at a dinner, served at the Clifton hotel.

The children of the couple were present and guests gathered from many cities and states. The gathering was a most pleasant one, and the sounds of laughter echoed through the rooms and corridors of the old Clifton as it never did before.

Judge Henry W. Johnson presided as toast-master, and Rev. Elfreda L. Newport offered up prayer. Dr. J. Webster Bailey responded to the toast “Our Host and Hostess.”

Mr. Dunavan spoke entertainingly of “The Pioneer,” and Mrs. Ida Cove responded to “The Golden Wedding.”

Mr. and Mrs. Dunavan were married at the home of Mr. and Mrs. William Munson, parents of the bride, after a courtship of almost four years. J. Albert Dunavan, father of the groom of fifty years, resided on a farm seven miles northwest of Ottawa. He later purchased a tract of land on Indian creek, in Freedom township, and sent Samuel Dunavan, then 18 years old, to the new farm to herd cattle.

The country was not so thickly settled in those days as now and Samuel, the boy, became lonesome with nobody to talk to but the cows and his dog, and one day he wandered away to the Munson home, where he met Miranda Munson, then 17 years old.

Many a trip was made to the Munson home by Samuel Dunavan during the long months that followed, and he and Miss Miranda became pretty warm friends.

Then came a separation. The parents of the young woman decided to send her to college, and she was hustled away to Rockford to attend the Rockford Female Seminary, and Samuel Dunavan was sent to Bryant & Stratton College, where he graduated in 1859.

The young people kept up a regular chain of correspondence, and a short itme after his graduation and return form college Mr. Dunavan and Miss Munson were married. It was to be a quiet affair, with only a few of the near relatives present, and Jesse Green, uncle of the groom, was on hand to perform the ceremony.

After the wedding Mr. and Mrs. Munson took up their residence on the farm they now occupy near Baker Station, and where they have made their home ever since. Mr. and Mrs. Dunavan were born in La Salle county and have always made this county their home.

They raised a family of five children. Douglas L. Dunavan is an attorney of this city. Clarence V. Dunavan is a druggist in Millington. Mrs. Nettie L. Rogers lives in Kansas City, Mo. Mrs. May Hum is a resident of Adams township and Mrs. Cora Belle Watts is a resident of Earl township.

Jesse Green, who married Mr. and Mrs. Dunavan, died in Ryburn hospital last summer. Had he lived it was planned to have him again perform the ceremony, but since his death the old folks have decided that the ceremony performed half a century ago will hold good until the end comes.

There are but few people living today who attended the Dunavan-Munson wedding fifty years ago, and none was able to attend the celebration. One of the interesting features of the celebration today was the presence of the slippers and gloves worn by the bride and the gloves worn by the groom at the time of the wedding.


  1. Probably from the Ottawa Daily Republican-Times of March 22, 1909.

Louis P. Morel (1855-1897)

coal miner

Louis P. Morel married Marie Fritsch in Chicago on December 16, 1884. According to their marriage application both were born in Chicago, but Marie, at least, was born in France. She probably came from the Alsace region that was the home of many French people in the Somonauk-Serena area, close to Dayton. It’s also possible that Louis was related to some of the Morels living in the area.

In 1885 they moved to Dayton and bought a small three-room, one-story, frame house on lots 1 and 2 in block 7 of the original town of Dayton. [See the map on the home page of this site for location of house.] The lot also included a coal house and a well, and a board fence surrounding it all.

Louis and Marie had three children, all born in Dayton:
Louise, born March 15, 1886
George, born September 10, 1888
Emma Berthe, born December 12, 1889
Emma died October 20, 1896, and is buried in the Dayton cemetery.

On November 17, 1897, Louis was taking coal from a small surface mine near Dayton, when a mass of earth caved in on him, crushing him to death. He was buried in the Dayton cemetery, with his daughter Emma. [See his cemetery page on this site for more information.]

Marie, the widow, inherited the personal property – beds, bedding, kitchen equipment, furniture, and the only explicitly named item – the sewing machine. She sold the house for $300 and moved to Goble, Columbia County, Oregon with the children. She may have chosen this place because there were other Morel families there, perhaps related to her husband, although no such connection has yet been found.

In May of 1908, Louise, now aged 22, married Frederick “Fritz” Aniker. Marie died in Goble on October 19, 1914 and is buried in the Kobel Cemetery there. Son George died March 28, 1917 and Louise on June 27, 1930. They are also buried in the Kobel Cemetery.

Graduates from the Dayton School in 1900

graduation cap & books

The following notice appeared in The Ottawa Journal, July 8, 1900
Graduates of Dayton school: Clyde Channell, Emma Fraine, Edith Olmstead, Mary Ward

What happened to these four young people after they left the Dayton school?

Clyde Wamsley Channell was born in Dayton July 5, 1887, the son of John W. Channel and Josephine Makinson. After attending the University of Illinois for 2 years, he became a surveyor for the railroad. He then tried farming in Minnesota, where he married Carrie McGee on April 5, 1911, in Itasca County, Minnesota.  They moved to Florida by 1930, where he worked for the post office in Arcadia. He died there on February 10, 1957.

Emma Clementine Fraine was the daughter of Charles Fraine and Clemence Petitcolin. She was born in Dayton May 22, 1885 and after two years of additional schooling in Dayton she became a schoolteacher herself. She first taught in a rural school north of Earlville, later going to Waltham Township to teach. She then taught in the Kleiber School northeast of Ottawa and in Grand Ridge. During these years she was busy furthering her own education and taking summer courses at DeKalb. In the year 1907 she was assigned to teach the primary grades in the two-room Dayton school and continued in that capacity until her retirement in 1952. She died in 1959 in California, at the home of her sister-in-law.

Edith May Olmstead was the daughter of Charles H. Olmstead and Anna M. Burgess. She was born February 14, 1886 and following graduation from the Dayton school, she went to Ottawa Township High School, graduating in 1904. She then taught school in the rural schools of the county. She married Edwin Miller about 1918, but the marriage did not last, ending in divorce before 1940. She died in October 1968, and is buried in the Ottawa Avenue Cemetery.

Mary Elizabeth Ward was the daughter of Edward Joseph Ward and Alice Virginia Furr. She was born April 28,1883, in Dayton. After graduating from the Dayton school she went on to 2 years of high school. On September 12th, 1905 she married Robert J. W. Briggs, a veterinarian from Ottawa. His job took them to various locations in South Dakota and Nebraska. They returned to Ottawa when he retired and Mary died there September 24, 1948

Shooting Affair at Dayton – 1869

gunslingerShooting Affair at Dayton

About 6 o’clock P. M., on Wednesday evening, Feb 10th, Elijah Martin, a young man about 19 years of age, was quietly passing through the village of Dayton, in this county, driving a cow and having two or three dogs with him, when Charles Lott, aged about 25 years, meeting him, took out a revolver and shot one of Martin’s dogs. There were some words, and Lott fell to beating Martin, Lott being apparently in liquor. The boy, as soon as released, ran home to get his gun. His parents not allowing him to take it, he ran to a neighbor’s and borrowed a gun, and started in pursuit of Lott. He found him between Isaac Green’s house and barn, and at once fired upon him, but without effect. Lott returned the fire with his revolver, also without effect. Martin, after exploding a cap or two upon his second barrel, (his gun being a common fowling piece) fired a second time, the shot taking effect in the lower part of Lott’s abdomen and upper part of his thighs. Lott fell and was conveyed to his house. The gun being loaded with No. 6 shot, and fired from a distance of 30 yards, the wound can only be dangerous from its peculiar location in the abdomen. Martin’s father and mother were close behind him trying to dissuade him from his purpose as he attacked Lott, but without effect. Lott is having good surgical attendance, and is as yet considered in no danger. Martin is still at large.1


  1. Ottawa Free Trader, February 13, 1869, p. 1, col. 1

Miles Masters (1846-1910)

Masters, Miles

Miles Masters was born December 4, 1846, in Berlin township, Bureau county, Illinois, the son of John and Maria (Belknapp) Masters. He grew up on his father’s farm with his four brothers. On January 31, 1865, he enlisted in company A of the 148th Illinois Infantry at Princeton, Ill. He received his discharge at Tullahoma, Tennessee on June 19, 1865 and returned home to Bureau county, Illinois, where he worked as a miller.

In 1891 he came to Dayton and joined with Mary S. Green, John Green, and A. E. Butters to incorporate as The Dayton Milling and Power Company. In 1894 he purchased and refit the Dayton Mills, advertising “Having purchased and refit the Dayton Mills to a full Roller Process on Wheat, we take this method as one of the means of informing farmers, and the public in general, of our now Superior Facilities for Doing FIRST-CLASS WORK in all BRANCHES of CUSTOM GRINDING.”

Around 1890, he began to show symptoms of mental distress. Association with persons afflicted with spiritualist mania caused him to change from Methodism to spiritualism. His mental condition deteriorated until, in 1901, he was committed to the asylum in Kankakee.

“Mr. Masters has become convinced that reincarnation has taken place – that the spirit of one of the greatest philosophers the world has ever known is now in his body taking the place of his own spirit. He also imagines that he can converse with the dead and living at will – even those in the flesh at a great distance. He also imagines that he has constructed a wonderful invention.”1

He recovered enough to return to his home in Chicago, but in 1906, he was admitted to the Danville Soldiers’ Home. From there, he was transferred in 1907 to the Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Soldiers’ Home. His mania had not abated and an article in the Milwaukee Journal reported that, according to Miles Masters, who called himself “The Creative”, the end of the world was at hand.

“Democracy, Catholicism, Protestantism, Socialism and commercialism and all manner of the first Christian era dispensations are now to be assigned to oblivion.” After relieving himself of this prophecy the Creative volunteered a little information concerning himself and his mission. “I come to you as a man proclaiming the rights of man in fulfilling the creative laws of his being and have spoken as man never spoke before of the oneness and wholeness of God and man. This power has been given me from the higher spiritual spheres and is to last nine years. “2

Miles Masters died January 2, 1910, at the Soldiers’ Home in Milwaukee. He was buried in the Dayton Cemetery on January 5th.


  1. Ottawa Free Trader, 2 Aug 1901, p. 7, cols. 1-2
  2. Milwaukee Journal, 9 Jan 1909, p. 3, cols. 1-2

Married Amid Flowers

                                                             MARRIED AMID FLOWERS

                            A Wedding in Dayton With Many From Ottawa Present

The handsome residence of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Barnes, just across the line into Dayton township, was brilliantly illuminated and beautifully decorated Wednesday eve’g, the event being the marriage ceremony of Miss Carrie L. Barnes and Winfield S. Green, receiving clerk at the Illinois state penitentiary at Joliet. The large parlor, in which the ceremony took place, was decorated with smilax, ferns and sweet peas and carnations, and was crowded with the guests who were present to witness the ceremony. It was performed at 8:30, Rev. T. C. Matlack, of Joliet, chaplain of the penitentiary, officiating at the event. The groom was supported by S. M. Ahern, of Joliet, as best man, and the bridesmaids were Misses Kittie Shaver, Etta Barnes, Maud Pickens and Emma Barnes, with little Lucille Ribbs as flower girl. The bridal couple entered to the music of Mendelssohn’s wedding march, rendered by Miss Addie Warner, and during the ceremony Thomas’ mandolin orchestra rendered a very pretty wedding serenade.

After the ceremony and congratulations the guests were seated at a wedding dinner, which was one of the finest ever served in this vicinity, and afterwards dancing was the order until time for Mr. and Mrs. Green to take the train for their wedding tour, and the entire party went to the train with them, loading them down with rice and best wishes.

The bride’s costume was ivory satin, brocaded, and diamond ornaments. She carried bridal roses. The bridesmaid, Miss Kittie Shaver, wore white silk organdies over blue silk, and the other maids were all attired in white silk and carried pink and La France roses.

The presents were numerous and very beautiful. The Joliet associates of the groom sent down a very handsome one, and the others were all in keeping with it.

Those present were:

Messrs. and Mesdames John Channel, M. Masters, Breese, Dayton; Frank Lansing, Wedron: V. Canfield, Dayton; Dr. and Mrs. Lovejoy, Marseilles; C. G. Werner, Ella Sage, C. J. Metzger and Merrifield, Ottawa; John Bogert, Dayton, and W. Van Etten, Batavia.

Misses Addie Werner, Breese, Grace and Barbara Green, Myrtle, Sadie and Hattie Olmstead, Nettie Furr, Lena Bruner, Florence Pickens, Jennie and Lizzie Bogert, Fannie Bryan, Mary Ward, Della Masters and Nora Barnes.

Mesdames Laura Parr, M. E. Furr, Wm. Ribbs, John Barnes, A. Ladd, O. W. Trumbo, E. Rose, and Pitts, of Marseilles.

Messrs. Basil, Fred, W. R., Lyle, Joseph and Ralph Green, Ed McCleary, Rob Rhoades, Gus Kneusel, Louis Oleson, C. A. Dawell, H. G. Warner, James Green and Ed Rose, of Ottawa, and Captains W. A. Luke and L. P. Hall, Lieut. S. M. Ahern and W. L. Phillips, G. A. Miller and T. F. O’Malley, of Joliet.


  1. Ottawa Republican-Times, August 19, 1897, p3

The Charles Hoag family

Helen Hoag tombstone          Charles H Hoag, tombstone                                                                               Helen                         Charles                               Mary
Charles Hoag and his two wives in the Dayton Cemetery

In the following sketch, the names in red are of those buried in the Dayton Cemetery

Charles H. Hoag was born May 18, 1821 in Delft, New York. He spent several years in Michigan, arriving there in 1845. In 1847, in St. Joseph county, Michigan, he married Helen M. Robinson , who was born in 1829 in New York. They came to La Salle county in 1849 and settled on a rented farm in Dayton township. They had five children:
1. infant (never named) – born abt 1848, died in infancy
2. infant (never named) – born abt 1849, died in infancy
3. Mary D., b 30 Jul 1850, d. 25 Jun 1901, m. to  Leonidas “Lee” Fread
4. Clara – b. 28 Jan 1854, d. 27 Aug 1919, m. 22 Mar 1871 to Albert Fread
5. William Walter – b. 28 Aug 1855, d. 12 Jun 1879, m. 18 Sep 1878 to Ida Brumley
Helen Robinson Hoag died September 13, 1856.

On 5 Nov 1857, Charles Hoag married Mary A. Wells, who was born in New York November 13, 1841. They had nine children:
6. Charles Lincoln, b. 25 Apr 1859, d. 30 Jul 1928, m. 20 Dec 1884 to Callie I. Brady
7. George R., b. abt 1862, d. 1894
8. Lillie M., b. 25 Dec 1863, d. 20 Mar 1940, m. 11 Jun 1891 to Walter Carter (divorced)
9. Cynthia, b. abt 1865, d. 1868
10. Cyrus W., b. 8 Apr 1867, d. 14 Oct 1889
11. Frank Logan, b. 14 Oct 1869, d. 14 Jul 1936
12. Alvin H., b. 19 Sep 1871, d. 13 Oct 1939
13. Adams W., b. Apr 1874, d. 4 Mar 1943, m. 1 Mar 1898 to Josephine Beckwith
14. Maud C., b. 22 May 1879, d. 29 Jan 1962, m. 22 Dec 1898 to Caplus B. Stockham
Mary Wells Hoag died October 26, 1891.

After four years of steady toil on the rented farm, Charles Hoag purchased a farm adjoining the town plat of Serena, where he spent the rest of his life. Being public-spirited he did his share toward the improvement of his home town. In politics he  was first a Whig and later entered the Republican ranks. He held many local offices of trust, including town and school offices.

Charles died September 2, 1904.

10 year old boy dies in fall

On July 24, 1886, ten year old Leendert Bogerd was herding cattle for Mr. Baker, just west of Dayton, allowing them to graze as they moved along. He climbed a tree and when a dead limb broke off, he fell upon the roots below, which struck him in the stomach. He was found by the members of a Sunday school class who were out on a picnic. He was seriously hurt and said that he wanted to see his mother for he was going to die. He died the next day and was buried in the Dayton Cemetery. He was described in the newspaper as the son of Mr. and Mrs. Austin Simpson, but Simpson was his stepfather, having married his widowed mother.

The boy’s parents, born in Zeeland, Netherlands, had immigrated to the United States in 1872. Pieter Boogerd married Stoffelina van den Houten March 23, 1872, in Ouwerkerk, Netherlands. They left for the United States that same year, coming to Dayton, where Pieter’s brother, Leendert, was already living . In Dayton they anglicized their names to Peter and Lena Bogerd.

Peter and Lena had three children: Cornelius, born in 1874; Leendert, born in 1876; and Peter, born in 1878. Peter, the father, died in 1878 and Lena and the three children were living in Dayton in 1880, next door to John and Jacoba Baker, another Dutch couple from Zeeland.

After Peter’s death Lena remarried, in 1881, to Austin Simpson, a coal miner and farmer from Dayton. When he retired they moved to Ottawa where Lena died in 1924.

Oliver Trumbo and his brothers

Trumbo brothers

In the 1850 census of Dayton township, there were 23 residents born in Virginia. In 1860 that number had grown to 44. A large part of the increase can be put down to the arrival of Jacob Trumbo and his family. Jacob and his wife, Elizabeth (Snyder) Trumbo, were natives of the Brock’s Gap area of Rockingham County, Virginia. Their children were educated in the common schools there and worked on the family farm. In 1853 Jacob and Elizabeth moved to the Dayton area, where his half-brother Mathias had settled in 1830. They brought seven of their eight living children with them. Only the oldest son, Benjamin, remained behind in Brock’s Gap where he lived out his life. Jacob bought a quarter section of farm land near Dayton and settled the family there. Unfortunately, he died within six months of their arrival, leaving his sons to work the land for their mother.

Oliver, the next oldest son after Benjamin, spent the next few years in farming. In 1854 he married Rebecca, daughter of John Green. In 1857 he joined with his father-in-law and two brothers-in-law in the firm of J. Green and Sons, which operated the woolen mill in Dayton.

Oliver was active in local community affairs, serving as constable, township collector, assessor and road commissioner. He was appointed postmaster of Dayton, serving  from 1857 to 1866. After the failure of the woolen mill in 1873, Oliver returned to farming. He and Rebecca had two daughters; Jessie, born in 1867, and Frankie Rae, born in 1876.. Jessie lived to adulthood, married, and had many descendants, while Frankie died of malarial fever at the age of 7. Oliver and Rebecca made their home in Dayton, until Oliver died in 1905. Rebecca continued to live in their home, but spent winters with her daughter Jessie, who lived in Mendota.

Moab bought land for himself in 1859 and also continued to work his mother’s land.. He lived there with his mother and two younger brothers, Matthias and Christopher, who also worked on the farm. In 1860, Moab’s land was worth $5000 and his mother’s, $17,000. In 1873, Moab bought the family farm from his mother, who had moved into a house in Dayton by that time.

Benjamin, the son who remained in Virginia, made regular trips to Illinois to visit and one of them provided the opportunity to have this picture taken. It must have been taken between 1859, when son John died, and 1869, when both Matthias and Christopher died of consumption. Matthias had been in ill health and went back to Virginia in the hopes it would improve, but it did not, and he died there. Less than a month later, Christopher also died, leaving Oliver and Moab the only remaining brothers in Illinois.