Graduates from the Dayton School in 1900

graduation cap & books

The following notice appeared in The Ottawa Journal, July 8, 1900
Graduates of Dayton school: Clyde Channell, Emma Fraine, Edith Olmstead, Mary Ward

What happened to these four young people after they left the Dayton school?

Clyde Wamsley Channell was born in Dayton July 5, 1887, the son of John W. Channel and Josephine Makinson. After attending the University of Illinois for 2 years, he became a surveyor for the railroad. He then tried farming in Minnesota, where he married Carrie McGee on April 5, 1911, in Itasca County, Minnesota.  They moved to Florida by 1930, where he worked for the post office in Arcadia. He died there on February 10, 1957.

Emma Clementine Fraine was the daughter of Charles Fraine and Clemence Petitcolin. She was born in Dayton May 22, 1885 and after two years of additional schooling in Dayton she became a schoolteacher herself. She first taught in a rural school north of Earlville, later going to Waltham Township to teach. She then taught in the Kleiber School northeast of Ottawa and in Grand Ridge. During these years she was busy furthering her own education and taking summer courses at DeKalb. In the year 1907 she was assigned to teach the primary grades in the two-room Dayton school and continued in that capacity until her retirement in 1952. She died in 1959 in California, at the home of her sister-in-law.

Edith May Olmstead was the daughter of Charles H. Olmstead and Anna M. Burgess. She was born February 14, 1886 and following graduation from the Dayton school, she went to Ottawa Township High School, graduating in 1904. She then taught school in the rural schools of the county. She married Edwin Miller about 1918, but the marriage did not last, ending in divorce before 1940. She died in October 1968, and is buried in the Ottawa Avenue Cemetery.

Mary Elizabeth Ward was the daughter of Edward Joseph Ward and Alice Virginia Furr. She was born April 28,1883, in Dayton. After graduating from the Dayton school she went on to 2 years of high school. On September 12th, 1905 she married Robert J. W. Briggs, a veterinarian from Ottawa. His job took them to various locations in South Dakota and Nebraska. They returned to Ottawa when he retired and Mary died there September 24, 1948

Lyle Green’s Purebred Jersey Cattle

Jersey cows

In the early years of the twentieth century, Greenacres, the Green farm in Dayton, was celebrated for its prize-winning herd of Jersey cattle. The farm was run by Lyle A. Green, son of Isaac Green and grandson of John. As can be seen in the information below, Lyle was well known as a breeder and had many cows that were top producers of milk and butterfat. They also had very aristocratic names and pedigrees.

1918 Register of Merit of Jersey Cattle

Cows owned by Lyle Green: Prince’s Cynthia, Prince’s Susanne, Fern’s Amy, Morocco’s Grey Princess, Gilderoy’s Vic, Bobby’s Helen

Cows bred and owned by Lyle Green: Raleigh’s Meg, Raleigh’s Penelope, Raleigh’s Ota, Raleigh’s Minnie Fite, Raleigh’s Lady Brookhill, all sired by Raleigh’s Lord Brookhill;
Lodestar’s Gilderoy, Lodestar’s Tuscan Fern, sired by Sultan’s Lodestar;
Raleigh’s Trudie, sired by Le Cotil’s Raleigh.

Register of merit rules: All cows over 5 years must produce at least 360 lbs. of butterfat in a year. 2 year olds start at 250.5 lbs butterfat and the amount required increases until the cow is 5 years old.

Raleigh’s Minnie Fite was the top producer, with 420.35 lbs. of butterfat and 7635.7 Lbs. of milk. She was aged 2 years, 11 months, and was estimated to weigh 790 lbs.

Contention Over Water

old dam

The old dam at Dayton

From Dayton

Dayton, July 26. – Misses Myrtle Stadden and Julia Lyons, of Chicago, are visiting at Mrs. David Green’s.

Miss Amy Dickens, of Amboy, Ill., is spending the summer at  Mr. Charles Green’s.

Miss Lillian Wayland, of Appleton, Wis., is spending the summer at Mr. D. Moore’s.

Mr. Wm. Dunavan, of the horse collar works, returned from a short business trip last week.

Mr. James Green says that the honey business is of no account this season. Usually he has between nine and ten thousand pounds of honey for sale, but this season he hasn’t a pound. Thinks perhaps he will be obliged to feed his bees this fall.

Miss Bangs, of Ottawa, who has been spending a few weeks in Dayton, has returned home.

Canal Supt. Leighton, of Lockport, was in town this week.

The river is lower than it had ever been in the remembrance of the oldest inhabitant. The mills have been able to run most of the time, but with decreased power.

The Free Trader, with the remainder of the Ottawa press, got things badly mixed on the power question, and has given the Dayton mill owners some unnecessary scoring. The Green and Stadden lease with the State provides for one-half of the water flowing in Fox river, of which the State is to have one-fourth of the river, and Green and Stadden one-fourth of the river, (not one-eighth as the Free Trader had it last week.) These two-fourths must be drawn first, even if the other one-half runs down the river.

The Ottawa power is third class, and when only one fourth of the river is drawn through the feeder, as it is during eight or nine months of the year, the Dayton power is entitled to all the water except what is necessary for canal purposes. Green and Stadden were not foolish enough, as the Ottawa press would have the public infer, to give away all their rights when they gave the State a right-of-way and one-half of their power. Any lease or agreement made between the State and the Hydraulic Company cannot affect the original and right of way lease.

In 1870 Mr. Wm. Thomas brought an injunction suit against Messrs. Williams and Sweetzer to prevent them from locating their paper mill on the power at Dayton. The claim was made then, as it is now, that we were using more water than we were entitled to. Judge Leland dismissed the suit, and decided that the Dayton power had preference over the hydraulic power, and in time of low water the side cut should be closed so as to keep a 6-foot head in the canal. If this could not be maintained, the Dayton fourth could be drawn on.

The present condition of affairs is this: The mill owners have agreed with Capt. Leighton to confine themselves strictly to their one-fourth, and to run as long as there is water.

The Hydraulic Co. is entitled to the surplus water of the canal, and, as there is no surplus from Fox river now (all of the water being used by the canal and the Dayton mills), water is being drawn from the other level at Marseilles to supply power for the Ottawa mills.1


  1. Ottawa [Illinois] Free Trader, July 30, 1887, p. 8, col. 4