The Little Red Hen

In June 1957 the graduation ceremonies at the Dayton school included a number of songs and plays.
Grades 6, 7, and 8 presented the operetta “All About Spring”.
The 5th grade girls gave a reading, “O Wide Wide World”.
Grade 3 sang the English hiking song, “Heave Ho”.
Grades 1 and 2 sang “The Robin in My Cherry Tree”.
The boys of grades 3, 4, and 5 sang “Take Me Out to the Ball Game”.

But surely the highlight of the festivities must have been grades 1 and 2’s presentation of “The Little Red Hen”. Here’s the cast:

Narrators: Danny Kossow and Susan Krug
The Little Red Hen: Nancy Sensiba
The Miller: Stephen Robertson
The Cat: Georgia Clark
The Pig: Robert Wilson
The Frog: Tim Gage
and last, but not least, the Little Chickens: Gerald Abell, Patsy Arwood, Shirley Arwood, Darlene Clark, Ronald Grieves, David Harmon, Janel Hiland, Judith Mathews, Susan Mathews, and Pamela Spence.

If only cell phone cameras had existed then!!

Dayton School Has Reunion at Community House

picture of school

Opened in 1891, this school replaced the one which burned in 1890

From the Ottawa Republican-Times, June 14, 1937, p6

Graduates of the Dayton school from towns and cities in various parts of Illinois gathered Saturday night in the Dayton Community House for a reunion, planned by the Dayton School Alumni association.

There was a banquet and dancing. Mrs. George Pool, who later was elected president of the association, presided as toastmistress.

Mrs. Fred Sapp of Ottawa told of the coronation in England, which she viewed.

Short talks were given by Ralph Green, who offered a toast to members of the 1937 graduating class of the school; Miss Blanche Reynolds and Miss Emma Fraine. Miss Maud Green told of the history of the Dayton school and how it was established over 100 years ago.

Miss Beulah Canfield, who arranged this year’s reunion, presided at a business session at which Mr. Pool was elected president; Rush Green, vice president; Miss Loretta Gleason, secretary and Herbert Mac Grogan, treasurer. Retiring officers are Miss Canfield, president; Ralph Green, vice president; Miss Helen Hallowell, secretary and Herbert Mac Grogan, treasurer. A social time and dancing followed.

Blush pink and gold were used in the appointments of the banquet. There were yellow tapers and pink peonies and roses in crystal services on the tables. At the place of each guest were miniature girl graduates in pink and tiny tulip nut cups.

The basement of the house, where there was dancing, was decorated with honeysuckle.

Miss Canfield was in general change of the reunion. Mrs. Gilbert Masters and Miss Hallowell arranged the program and Miss Jennie Fraine had charge of the table decorations.

Agreement to Adventure

In February of 1849, the Greens had decided to go to the California gold fields. Young Torkel Erickson was drawn by the idea of adventure and wanted to join the westward rush. The problem  was how to afford the trip and how to travel with others for protection.

This was solved when the Greens offered to include him in their party, providing he would work his way. The result was an agreement signed by both parties wherein the Greens agreed to furnish provisions and ammunition to get to the Sacramento valley of California, furnish provision, tools, and ammunition for one year after commencing work at gathering gold, and pay all necessary expenses on the trip.

In return Torkel Erickson, in the document above, agrees to assist in driving the teams going to California, and to give the Greens one half of the proceeds of his earnings or labor for one year after they commence work, at gathering gold or any other business in California.

He additionally agrees to compensate the Greens if he is unable to work for any considerable length of time due to sickness or any other cause; the compensation to be based on the price for labor in the immediate area. The agreement was written up and signed in the presence of two witnesses.

The Greens proceeded with their arrangements for the trip and were ready to set out for California leaving Ottawa on April 2 on the Timoleon which they chartered to take them through to St. Joseph, on the Missouri river. No other men had yet offered to work for their passage, but three men must have decided at the last minute to go along. The agreements with Jackson Beem, Erick Erickson, and Alanson Pope were written and signed on April 3, presumably on the boat.