Autumn in Dayton 143 Years Ago

 

Rural Happenings

            Dayton, Oct. 2, 1879. – The past few days have been quite warm, in fact uncomfortably so. But then winter is not far away, for –

“Summer is gone on swallow’s wings,
And Earth has buried all her flowers;
No more the lark, – the linnet – sings,
But Silence sits in faded bowers.

There is a shadow on the plain
Of Winter ere he comes again, –
There is in woods a solemn sound
Of hollow warnings whispered round,

As Echo in her deep recess
For once had turned a prophetess.
Shuddering Autumn stops to list,
And breathes his fear in sudden sighs,
With clouded face, and hazel eyes
That quench themselves, and hide in mist.”

J. B. Jennings has rented the Exchange to Mr. James Timmons and has moved to his farm in Iowa.

Mr. Anson Spencer’s family have gone to Texas to seek health and a new home. Mr. S. will soon follow them.

John G. Dunavan and family of Rutland, have made Dayton their home

O. W. Trumbo and family were visiting friends in Chicago last week.

Mr. Silas Dunavan, son of G. M. Dunavan, Esq., and who has spent the past fifteen years in the west, has returned home for a brief visit.

Mr. John Green departed Tuesday for a few days visit, – with the big pumpkins and squashes, of course, – at the Wenona Union Fair.

Nearly a dozen of our people visited your city last Tuesday evening to hear the wonderful Remenyi. With one exception they returned well pleased with the concert, and voted Remenyi a first class artiste.
[Remenji, a Hungarian violinist, gave a concert in Ottawa on September 30, with over 400 in the audience. I wonder who the lone dissenter was.]

Rev. Sophie Gibb of Sheriden delivered an excellent discourse at the school house last Sabbath evening.

Rev. G. B. Barnes of Ottawa preached to the Dayton people last week. Mr. Barnes, we understand, will give his views on “Universalism” at his next appointment.

Mr. Andrew Rhoads left us Wednesday for a visit to Kansas.

Messrs. William Stadden and Walter Trumbo, who have been out west examining the farming lands of Nebraska, returned home last Friday.

Green Bros. have just finished burning another fine lot of tile.

The woolen mills are turning out some fine flannels and blankets. Being the genuine article, made of all wool, they are in good demand.

Occasional1


  1. The Ottawa Free Trader, October 4, 1879, p. 8, col. 1

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