A Meteor in the January Skies

meteor

from the Ottawa Free Trader, January 8, 1881

Dayton, Jan. 5. – The river is now being crossed at this place on the ice.

Prof. H. L. Boltwood, of Ottawa, delivered an excellent New Year’s discourse at the school house last Sunday. Preaching every two weeks at 4 P. M.

School commenced last Monday after a holiday vacation of one week.

Mr. Frank Dunavan made his New Year’s calls in Dayton.

A watch meeting was held by the young folks at the residence of C. B. Hess, Esq., last Friday evening. A goodly number were present, and report a very enjoyable time.

Last Saturday evening about 8 o’clock a large and brilliant meteor was seen by a few fortunate ones who chanced to be “‘neath the starry heavens.” It started nearly overhead and “struck a bee line” for the northeast, leaving a tail of fire after it resembling a comet. Just before it reached the horizon it exploded, throwing out particles in all directions. The sight was magnificent. By the Chicago Times of Monday, we notice it was seen in Chicago and in Battle Creek, Michigan. At the latter place the light from the meteor was so brilliant as to dim the gaslight.1

A grand concert will be given by the Musical Union at the school house Friday evening, Jan. 14. They will be assisted by the Harmony Quartette of Ottawa, and the chorus of 25 voices will be accompanied by 1st and 2d violins, bass and organ. Everybody invited to attend.

Mr. Newton Hess and lady last week celebrated in a becoming manner their tin wedding.

The woolen mill has been running all winter on a large order for cavalry blankets for the government.

Last Saturday evening a large reception was given by Mr. and Mrs. Geo. W. Gibson, of Rutland, in honor of the return of their son Lewis with his bride from Nebraska. The party was the finest of the season and a most enjoyable affair. The large residence was completely filled with guests, who were pleasantly received by the host and hostess. Dancing continued through the evening; and refreshments were served during an intermission. The hour was “wee sma'” before the guests departed. The reception was a joyous one and quite complimentary to the host and hostess.

The Literary meets at the residence of Mr. David Grove next Saturday evening.

Occasional


  1. In the Chicago Tribune of January 3, the meteor was described as “about the size of a full moon, and was enveloped in a beautiful flame of lightish blue tint, while following in its wake were several bright red fragments. Time of transit, fifteen minutes.”

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